As the people of God gather week by week, the cross is rightly central; however that centrality rightly observed brings many other truths into view and into focus. And only the cross can bring them all together, enable them all to be understood, and communicate our need of God’s grace. From Fred Sanders. The Cross …

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The resurrection life is central to Christian experience, but the resurrection life derives its meaning in the completed work of the cross. From Fleming Rutledge: What then is the resurrection? It is the vindication of the crucified One. The resurrection doesn’t cancel out the crucifixion as if it were only a passing episode to be …

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Fleming Rutledge observes that the execution method which Jesus suffered was one that was carried out upon those guilty of a particular crime against the state. His execution marked him as an enemy of the state. It served as a warning to any who might resist its authority. This is the means by which Jesus …

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In John 13 Jesus tells Peter “Where I am going you cannot follow me now, but you will follow afterward.” Jesus is speaking of his death on the cross and the resurrection life that will be shared as a result. Peter will learn that his own suffering would consume him without resurrection life within him. …

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Fleming Rutledge on Jesus’ remaining completely in character while on the cross. And what a character it is. Jesus waging a battle on the cross. The whole business of the two thrives dramatises the intensity of his struggle to absorb into himself the malice of those who were reviling him, while at the same time …

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Heidelberg Catechism – Lord’s Day 16 40. Q. Why did Christ have to suffer death? A. Because the righteousness and truth of God are such that nothing else could make reparation for our sins except the death of the Son of God. 41. Q. Why was he “buried”? A. To confirm the fact that he …

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From Fleming Rutledge: “Religious figures are not usually associated with disgrace and rejection. We want our objects of worship to be radiant, dazzling avatars offering the potential of transcendent happiness. The most compelling argument for the truth of Christianity is the Cross at its center. Humankind’s religious imagination could never have produced such an image. …

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