mgpcpastor's blog


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Mother And Son

Mum’s been having a tough time lately.
We’re spending a few days close at hand.


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Weighted Mind by Sierra Hull

This version of Sierra Hull performing her song Weighted Mind turned up on YouTube.


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Marvel Remembers Stan Lee

This video is Marvel’s tribute to Stan Lee.
The take-away line is that Lee’s greatest creation was himself, the public persona of Marvel Comics.
That may detract a little from Lee’s contribution as co-creator, plotter, and scripter.
It also brings into focus how his public persona served to eclipse those whose creative contributions were at least as significant as Lee’s.
Look up Jack Kirby’s creation ‘Funky Flashman’ if you want an acerbic personal point of view about Lee’s public personality from the 1970s.
Anyway, this video highlights what Lee did contribute, which was himself.


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Zack Eswine on The Busy Pastor (via Jared C. Wilson)

If you can find time, this podcast featuring Zack Eswine on The Busy Pastor would be worth listening to.
It can be found at For The Church.


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Church Is A Slow-Cooker, Not A Microwave (via Aaron Earles at Facts And Trends)

A simple reminder from Aaron Earles that the a very significant part of the enduring fruit of Christian discipleship happens in the context of relationships and takes time.
The conclusion:

Because conversion, discipleship, relationships, and leadership all take time, it’s no wonder that change usually takes time in a church as well.
When we see new people come to Christ, grow in their faith, form committed relationships with others, and develop into new leaders for the church, change and institutional growth will happen.
In the meantime, however, progress and change can seem to be moving so slow. But it’s worth the wait.
You could probably microwave a pot roast and cook the meat, but the results taste much better with a slow cooker.
You can’t rush everything in church—and we are better off for it.

Read the article at Facts And Trends.


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Vale Stan Lee

I started reading comic books in the mid 1970’s.
I was then, and continue to be a DC guy, but by the time I got into Marvel in 1978 the comics were all presented by Stan Lee, but Stan Lee himself was already gone from the day-to-day production of Marvel comics.
It’s been over forty years since Lee last really regularly wrote comics, with various items since then of a one-off or special nature.
Yet it is true to say that Lee gave the characters created before 1970 their voices, and set the pattern for the way in which the lives of those characters would be portrayed.
Even those characters created after 1970, who form a substantial portion of the portfolio of characters that are part of the public consciousness bear the stamp of Lee’s characterisations.
Until the mid-seventies the template for the artistic depiction of Marvel’s characters was that of Jack Kirby.
Through till today the template for the written characterisation of all superhero comics is basically that of Stan Lee.
There will be much debate about the levels of recognition that should be afforded to the co-creators who worked with Lee.
But what should not be open to debate is that without Lee’s contribution US comic books in their current form would not exist, nor would they sound like they do in terms of the stories they tell.

I didn’t read comics when Stan Lee was creating the substantial body of work for which he is known.
But all the comics I have read have been created in the shadow of his contribution.

Excelsior!


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Growing New Instead Of Growing Old (via Abigail Dodds at Gospel Coalition)

Abigail Dodds writes an article that directly addresses women, but speaks to the experience of every Christian.
She contends that increasing age should represent a growth in more that the number of candles on our birthday cakes.

Now, instead of growing old, we are growing new. The mature Christian woman is the one who has been new for a long time. The mature Christian woman is the one who’s been with Christ long enough to have the unbelief of adulthood reworked into childlike faith. The mature Christian woman is the one who, though outwardly wasting away, is getting newer every single day (2 Cor. 4:16).
Yet how can a mind that’s growing old and forgetful also grow new? We all use our minds on something; perhaps not through relinquishing brain cells via childbirth, but in some form or another, our minds are spent. I have given my mind to storing information like: the location of the stray sock belonging to the 11-year-old, what chapter the 8-year-old needs to finish for history this week, when early bird registration ends for my oldest kids’ youth retreat, who needs new snow boots this year, what meetings my husband has this week. And even more importantly: what area of discipleship needs attention in each child, what godly habits could use further cultivating, what opportunities were missed last week for building up, connection, and growing together. All the data and information at times seem to crowd out coherence! What am I but a jumble of seemingly random, but repetitive, facts and concerns?
But this is a fertile place for newness to grow—in a mind and heart stuffed with the details and rhythms of life, worn out in the work God has entrusted. Our minds aren’t compromised by being used up; they’re replenished with something better than sharpness or quick-wits or brilliance. They’re replenished with a dependent wisdom that only Christ can supply, so that over the course of our lives—as we give away our brain space for the sake of those around us—we gain a mind that holds more than ours ever could have. We gain the mind of Christ, filled with humility, trust, and faith.

Read the whole post at Gospel Coalition.