mgpcpastor's blog


Leave a comment

Remembering We Are The Traffic (via Andrew Roycroft)

Here in the country we think that having five cars in front of us at the roundabout is an infringement of our human rights.
Andrew Roycroft recalls the observation ‘You are not stuck in traffic, you are the traffic’ as being a salient reminder that a traffic jam is not something that others are doing to you, but a common experience you’re sharing with others.
He offers observations to pastors, other church members, and young people.
The paragraphs directed at pastors seeks to deal with the ‘us and them’ mentality that can so easily develop (or be fed by church members).

Pastor, you are the traffic: one of the easiest areas to develop a ‘them and us’ attitude, to imagine oneself aloof from the cumulative setbacks and declines of the local church is in pastoral ministry. Pastors are called to teach God’s people, to edify and equip them for works of service, to care for and disciple Christians so that they grow through the seasons and storms of life. With this kind of work in hand it is easy to imagine that we are somehow divorced from sin’s co-operative, that we are solely curative rather than causative when it comes to spiritual regress.
In such circumstances I need to remind myself that I am the traffic, that I contribute my unit of fallen humanity to the community of God’s people who are clogging the highways to holiness and heaven. I am not merely an agent of change, but a subject for whom change is vital. My skewed perspectives and lopsided priorities, my casual acceptance of my own faults, my willingness to ignore what God says and transgress what God forbids, my truculence in the face of what God is clearly saying in his Word, are part of the problem we are all facing as pilgrims. Any other view of myself will lead to conceit, to unconfessed sin, to pastoral insensitivity, and to a Pharisaical approach to life which will be deadly to others. The acknowledgement that ‘I am the traffic’ will lead to true heart work, true self-scrutiny, and a vitality in my walk with God among his people which is indispensable.

Read the whole post at Thinking Pastorally.


Leave a comment

Unreal Christian Quotes (via Trevin Wax)

Trevin Wax examines quotes wrongfully associated with various Christians.
I hadn’t heard of a couple of these quotes, but was familiar with most.
Given how often you read some of them, i.e. “You do not have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body” often attributed to C.S. Lewis, or the phrase attributed to Francis of Assisi, “Preach the gospel at all times; when necessary, use words”, it is helpful to know what is true and what is not.
Read the post at Waxs’ blog at the Gospel Coalition.


Leave a comment

The Antidote To Domineering Leadership – Leading By The Beauty Of Example (via Sam Allberry)

Sam Allberry writes that culture on either side of the Atlantic Ocean contributes to two different strands of authoritarian leadership taking root in the church.
In concluding, his point is not that the antidote to bad leadership is not no leadership, but servant leadership – a leadership that leads by example. And that example comes not from an individual, but a team.

It is common in American churches to borrow leadership wisdom from the business world. The pastor is the CEO. His role is to bring success, often and especially measured in numerical terms: The church needs to grow in membership and giving. In the UK, it’s slightly different. The church tends toward a military model. The pastor is the three-star general who directs everyone to do the right things.
There is obviously much to be learned from both successful CEOs and also great generals, but both models can quickly become toxic. When either becomes the primary model for Christian leadership, is it any wonder that domineering pastors result? The pastor-as-CEO approach might foster entrepreneurialism and risk-taking, but it easily becomes results-oriented. The pastor-as-general approach might foster perseverance and grit, but it easily becomes task-oriented. One produces swagger: Their word is law because they’re economically indispensable to the church. The other produces presumption: Orders must be followed because the general “knows” what is best for every person. In each case we either tolerate or fail to see traits of bullying, because ministry ends justify ministry means.
+++
The antidote to being domineering, then, is to lead by example rather than by coercion: “Not domineering over those in your charge, but being examples to the flock” (1 Pet. 5:3).
The flock is to be led, yes, but not by force of personality. The flock is to be led by beauty of example. Being domineering is bad leadership; and the answer to bad leadership is not no leadership but the right kind of leadership.

Read the whole post at the Gospel Coalition (USA).


Leave a comment

Taking The Hill – With Grandma (Canoeing The Mountains)

Tod Bolsinger sums up the Church as a body that functions relationally and purposefully. Sometimes the relationships can subvert the purpose, sometimes the purpose can overwhelm the relationships.
Pastors can focus on maintaining relationships at the cost of mission, or focus on outreach at the cost of caring for those who are already there.
If this problem or the solution was obvious or easy for leaders to negotiate churches would be a lot healthier than they are.
Bolsinger points out that pastors have to do both, lead with outward purpose and inward empathy:

We are called to take the hill – with Grandma
Christian work is a “family” and a “business” at the same time. To be a Christian is to find identity and mutual commitment in relationships constituted by God that make us into brothers and sisters, these relationships are inherently and intrinsically important. And at the same time we are a business with a mission to fulfill, services to offer, constituencies to support and regulations, demands, and obligations required of us. The organisation that has inherently valuable relationships also has an instrumentally critical purpose. And holding that tension, leading a Christian organization that is faithful to both mission and family, is indeed the challenge for most of us.

Tod Bolsinger, Canoeing The Mountains IVP Books, 2015, pg 221.


Leave a comment

How Funko Makes Its Pop! Figures

Funko Pop! figures are a bit of phenomenon. Having watched toys and action figures for a few decades now, for something new to come and become a pervasive presence in both the general toy buying public and the collecting fanbase across a number of genres is very unusual. How long will it last?
Here’a couple of background videos.
One from Forbes. (a bit of sign that this is mainstream business)

And one from SYFY Wire.


Leave a comment

When The Goal Is To Know Everyone, Instead Of Everyone Knowing Jesus (via Thom Rainer)

Thom Rainer features a post dealing with one of the reservations Christians have about additional church services or congregational growth.
It runs along the line of “We can’t add another service! We won’t know everyone.” or “We’re dividing the church?”

One of the observations about that which Rainer offers is:

There are often unarticulated and underlying meanings to these objections.
It is not uncommon to start a new service with a different worship style. Some of the objectors may not really be concerned as much with the additional service as the style of worship.

It’s a helpful observation to try to unpack whether the presenting concern is the actual concern.
Most Christians want more people to come to Jesus, not to put a size limit on the Kingdom.

There are more points at Rainer’s blog, along with some helpful observations in the comments.


Leave a comment

How Deep The Father’s Love For Us – The Purple Hulls

The Purple Hulls’ rendition of How Deep The Father’s Love For Us emphasises the vocals with the instruments being comparatively understated.
(How can this song be twenty-four years old?)