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The Burden On The Privileged Reader Trying To Understand The Crucifixion Of Jesus (via Fleming Rutledge)

The fact that Jesus died by crucifixion is an integral aspect of God’s redemptive work. Appreciating the fullness of what Jesus endured for our sake is difficult for those whose social position shields them from personal experience or exposure to the fullness of the injustice of it all.
Difficult, but not impossible. But we do have to accept that we have a blind spot and effort to empathise is required.
From Fleming Rutledge.

The all-important connection between the method used to execute Jesus and the meaning of his death cannot be grasped unless we plumb the depths of what is meant by injustice. There is much irony here, for injustice is a threatening subject for the ruling classes who have the time and inclination for reading books like this one. Those who suffer most from injustice are the poorly educated, the impoverished, the invisible. Justice is involved with law and judges; the people most likely to suffer injustice cannot afford good lawyers, do not even know any lawyers, whereas lawyers and judges are the ones who have the money to buy books. In other words, those most likely to be affected by the issues raised in this chapter are least likely to be reading about them. This puts an extra burden on the privileged reader, but such challenges are not unrelated to Jesus’ teaching that the one who does not take up his cross and follow him is not worthy of him (Matt. 10:38). Trying to understand to understand someone else’s predicament lies at the very heart of what it means to be a Christian.

Fleming Rutledge, The Crucifixion – Understanding The Death Of Jesus Christ Eerdmans, Grand Rapids MI, 2015, pp 106-107.


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The Crucifixion Is God Setting A Ruined Creation Aright (via Fleming Rutledge)

The Crucifixion is not simply about forgiveness, but about a creation that is profoundly ruined being remade by the power and action of God.

“The Messiah came, not to a purified and enlightened world spiritually prepared for his arrival, but rather to a humanity no nearer to its original goodness than on the day Cain murdered his borther Abel. Indeed, the barbarity of the crucifixion reveals precisely that diagnosis. From beginning to end, the Holy Scriptures testify that the predicament of fallen humanity is so serious, so grave, so irremediable from within, that nothing short of divine intervention can rectify it.”
Fleming Rutledge, The Crucifixion – Understanding The Death Of Jesus Christ Eerdmans, Grand Rapids MI, 2015, pg 127.


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Blessed Be Our God by Fernando Ortega

Blessed Be Our God is the first track on Fernando Ortega’s The Crucifixion Of Jesus.


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Prepare The Way, O Zion by Fernando Ortega

Prepare The Way, O Zion, a track from Fernando Ortega’s album, The Crucifixion Of Jesus.


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O Great Love, O Love Beyond All Measure by Fernando Ortega

O Great Love, O Love Beyond All Measure, a track from Fernando Ortega’s album The Crucifixion Of Jesus.


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Ah, Holy Jesus by Fernando Ortega

Ah, Holy Jesus is Robert Bridges’ translation of Johann Heermann original lyric.
It also features on Fernando Ortega’s The Crucifixion Of Jesus album.


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Stricken, Smitten, And Afflicted by Fernando Ortega

I’ve been listening to Fernando Ortega’s new album The Crucifixion Of Jesus for a few weeks now.
A grouping of songs and readings dealing with the portions of the Gospels that recount the passion of Jesus, the album as a whole is a very satisfying listen, and the sum of the whole enhances appreciation of the various facets.
Ortega has collected the tracks very thoughtfully.
Which is to say that songs like Thomas Kelly’s lyrics and the tune O Mein Jesu, Ich Muss Sterben, better known in English as the hymn Stricken, Smitten, And Afflicted are even better when you hear them in their album context.
Here’s a lyric video of the album track.