Mez McConnell carries out remarkable ministry among marginalised groups of people, a background that he shares with those he ministers to. Here he writes about the way in which the doctrine of substitutionary atonement, rather than detracting from his ministry to the needs of people, actually is the foundation that enables him to serve. Here’s …

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Heidelberg Catechism – Lord’s Day 16 40. Q. Why did Christ have to suffer death? A. Because the righteousness and truth of God are such that nothing else could make reparation for our sins except the death of the Son of God. 41. Q. Why was he “buried”? A. To confirm the fact that he …

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Heidelberg Catechism – Lord’s Day 15 37. Q. What do you understand by the word “suffered”? A. That throughout his life on Earth, but especially at the end of it, he bore in body soul the wrath of God against the sin of the whole human race, so that by his suffering, as the only …

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From Fleming Rutledge: “Religious figures are not usually associated with disgrace and rejection. We want our objects of worship to be radiant, dazzling avatars offering the potential of transcendent happiness. The most compelling argument for the truth of Christianity is the Cross at its center. Humankind’s religious imagination could never have produced such an image. …

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Heidelberg Catechism – Lord’s Day 6 16. Q. Why must he be a true and righteous man? A. Because God’s righteousness requires that man who has sinned should make reparation for sin, but the man who is himself a sinner cannot pay for others. 17. Q. Why must he at the same time be true …

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Heidelberg Catechism – Lord’s Day 5 12. Q. Since, then, by the righteous judgment of God we have deserved temporal and eternal punishment, how may we escape this punishment, come again to grace, and be reconciled to God? A. God wills that his righteousness be satisfied; therefore, payment in full must be made to his …

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