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Augustine

The final theologian statue is probably the most significant of them all.
Augustine’s ministry, life, and teaching are recognised by the entire Christian Church.


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J. C. Ryle

I was introduced to the writings of John Charles Ryle by my then pastor, George Logan.
Ryle’s writings on the Gospels are timeless: theological and practical, doctrinal and devotional.
Reading them never fails to inform and instruct.
It was a pleasure to order a Ryle theologian statue.
Here’s a brief article about him written by John Piper.


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John Knox

My John Knox theologian statue from Missional Wear arrived.

Knox was not so much a theologian as a pastor.

A working-class theologian as it were.

I was glad to have backed the creation of this statue because Knox seems neglected among those who have contributed to our theological heritage.


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What Is Reformation Day? (via Stephen Nichols at Ligonier)

May churches will acknowledge the Reformation tomorrow, the Sunday before October 31.
Stephen Nichol provides a summary of why.

What is Reformation Day? It is the day the light of the gospel broke forth out of darkness. It was the day that began the Protestant Reformation. It was a day that led to Martin Luther, John Calvin, John Knox, and may other Reformers helping the church find its way back to God’s Word as the only authority for faith and life and leading the church back to the glorious doctrines of justification by grace alone through faith alone in Christ alone. It kindled the fires of missionary endeavors, it led to hymn writing and congregational singing, and it led to the centrality of the sermon and preaching for the people of God. It is the celebration of a theological, ecclesiastical, and cultural transformation.

Read the whole post at Ligonier.


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It’s Still Good News (via Michael Reeves)

The good news proclaimed at the Reformation in 1517 is still good news in 2017 and beyond.
Which is why the Reformation will never really be over, or a thing of the past.
From Michael Reeves on why the Reformation still matters:

Almost certainly, what confuses people into thinking that the Reformation is a bit of history we can move beyond is the idea that it was just a reaction to some problem of the day. But the closer one looks, the clearer it becomes: the Reformation was not principally a negative movement about moving away from Rome and its corruption; it was a positive movement, about moving toward the gospel. And that is precisely what preserves the validity of the Reformation for today. If the Reformation had been a mere reaction to a historical situation five hundred years ago, one would expect it to be over. But as a program to move ever closer to the gospel, it cannot be over.

Source


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Pierre Durand, Huguenot Martyr – Simonetta Carr

Simonetta Carr introduces the forgotten people of Christian history, this time Pierre Durand:

Pierre Durand was not simply an isolated martyr in the history of the church.
He was one of the main architects in a concerted effort to bring the Huguenot churches to unity, order, and theological orthodoxy.

read about Durand here.


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Billy Graham In Sydney (via Philip Jensen)

There’s no shortage of Billy Graham reflection pieces since his death.

I watched Peter Jensen be interviewed on Dominic Steele’s The Pastor’s Heart webcast where he mentioned his response to the Graham Crusade of 1959 as a 15 year old, and that his 13 year old brother followed him forward.
Philip Jensen provides his perspective of being that 13 year old.
But it’s the human story of the impact of Graham’s ministry that remains.
From Jensen:

However, the main impact of the Graham crusades was felt at the grass roots of our society rather than in the public domain. Certainly, many who made a decision for Christ, later fell away – but the long-term impact in the lives of individuals, families and churches can still be found across Australia. Half the students training at Moore College to become Ministers during the 60’s were converted at the ‘59 crusade. Nearly all the youth group I lead were converted in the ‘68 crusade. The church I pastored doubled in size during 1979, largely as a result of the that year’s crusade. At university I met a girl who, as a young teenager, was converted in 1959 listening to Billy Graham on a landline in Broken Hill. That’s how my wife became a Christian.
Read the whole post here.