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Some Facts About June 4, 1963 That Make Me Feel Even Older

Here’s an excerpt of some facts about people born on June 4, 1963 that I found online.
I have no intention of trying to work out if they’re true.
The make me feel older.
Especially the dog years one.
There was a theory that this applied to people who were Presbyterian ministers in South Australia…

Anyway, here’s some of the facts.

Days since birth: 20,454 days
Days spent sleeping: 6,818 days
Years spent sleeping: 18.67 years
Part of life spent sleeping: 33%
Full moons since birth: 693
Next full moon: June 17 at 08:32:00 GMT – Monday
First one billion seconds: Sometime on February 10, 1995
Age in dog years: 267 dog years old using a Chinese Shar-Pei breed


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Kodi Lee – Blind, Autistic, Talented

On the off chance you haven’t seen or heard this – watch this video of Kodi Lee auditioning on America’s Got Talent.
It’s been watched about 17 million times when I posted this, and it’ll pick up millions more.

Kodi Lee is blind and autistic, and he comes out on stage to sing and play the piano.
See for yourself.
If you’ve already watched it, watch it again.
You may need a tissue or two.


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A Capital City With A Population Of Zero (via Half As Interesting)

This video about a capital city with a population of zero is not about Canberra on a long weekend.
Joking aside, it really exists (presently).


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Bear Grylls Reviews Survival Movies

In this video from Vanity Fair, survival expert Bear Grylls gives his opinion on the plausibility of survival scenes from a variety of movies.
Grylls may seem overly generous a couple of times (I still believe there was room for Leo on the raft in Titanic) but you do learn a bit about him as he expresses the background situations that formed the basis for his opinions.


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Alaskan Car Jumping

This could be a thing in Mount Gambier.
Simple premise: people watching stripped back vehicles speed off the edge of a cliff.
“Gravity always wins”

A news report style clip.

This video has better footage of the actual jumps.


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What Would Happen If Every Human Suddenly Disappeared?

Every human disappearing would be catastrophic for humans.
What about everything else?
This video has a crack at explaining.
(I sometimes think I wouldn’t mind giving it a go, but this does point out that my go wouldn’t last very long at all.)


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Therapeutic Lying (via Larissa MacFarquhar at The New Yorker)

An in-depth article in The New Yorker dealing with dementia care and the way its practictioners struggle with the lying and untruths that are part of the life of carers and patients.
Over the decades and even within among practitioners differing points of view and practices have been dominant and then given way to others.
Consider what it is to work day by day in a world where truth is often judged as being what the patient needs to hear.

In dementia care, everybody lies. Although some nursing homes have strict rules about being truthful, a recent survey found that close to a hundred per cent of care staff admitted to lying to patients, as did seventy per cent of doctors. In most places, as in Chagrin Valley, there is no firm policy one way or another, but the rule of thumb among the staff is that compassionate deception is often the wisest course. “I believe that deep down, they know that it is better to lie,” Barry B. Zeltzer, an elder-care administrator, wrote in the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease & Other Dementias. “Once the caregiver masters the art of being a good liar and understands that the act of being dishonest is an ethical way of being, he or she can control the patient’s behaviors in a way that promotes security and peace of mind.” Family members and care staff lie all the time, and can’t imagine getting through the day without doing so, but, at the same time, lying makes many of them uncomfortable. To ease this “deception guilt,” lying in dementia care has been given euphemistic names, such as “therapeutic fibbing,” or “brief reassurances,” or “stepping into their reality.”

Read The Comforting Fictions Of Dementia Care at The New Yorker.