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Brought Back To Life (preparing for MGPC 15/7/18)

Song: Good And Gracious King
Welcome
Call to Worship
Song: Rescuer
Prayer Of Confession
Song: Rock Of Ages
Affirming our Faith: Westminster Shorter Catechism Q26
Song: Worship, Honour, Glory, Blessing
Bible Reading: Titus 3 – Instruction in sound doctrine and good works and final greetings.
Bible Memorisation: Mark 8:34-35
Song: God Whose Almighty Word
Bible Reading: 1 Kings 17: 17-24
Sermon: Brought Back To Life
Song: The Church’s One Foundation
Announcements
Pastoral Prayer
Closing Blessing
Song: One True God


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Grace For Today (preparing for MGPC 8/7/18)

Song: From The Day
Welcome:
Call to Worship
Song: Jerusalem
Prayer Of Confession
Song: Approach My Soul The Mercy Seat
Affirming our Faith: Westminster Shorter Catechism Q26
Song: Unto God Be Praise And Honour
Bible Reading: Titus 2 – Having refuted false teachers in chapter 1, sound teaching is urged in chapters 2 and 3.
Bible Memorisation: Mark 8:34-35
Song: The Lord Is Great
Bible Reading: 1 Kings 17:7-17
Sermon: Grace For Today
Lord’s Supper
Song: Blessed Assurance
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer:
Closing Blessing
Song: Jesus Thank You


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A Light Shines In The Darkness (preparing for MGPC 1/7/18)

Order of Service
Song: Good And Gracious King
Welcome:
Call to Worship
Song: From The Day
Prayer Of Confession
Song: Beneath The Cross Of Jesus
Affirming our Faith: Westminster Shorter Catechism Q26
Song: Praise God From Whom All Blessings Flow
Bible Reading: Titus 1 – Greetings and the appointment of elders for the oversight of the churches.
Bible Memorisation: Mark 8: 34-35
Song: What a Friend We Have In Jesus
Bible Reading: 1 Kings 16:29-17:6
Sermon: A Light Shines In The Darkness
Song: Crown Him With Many Crowns
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer:
Closing Blessing
Song: Arise My Soul, Arise


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Kings Behaving Badly (preparing for MGPC 17/6/18)

Song: Good and Gracious King
Welcome:
Call to Worship
Song: From The Day
Prayer Of Confession
Song: He Will Hold Me Fast
Affirming our Faith: Westminster Shorter Catechism Q26
Song: Now To Him Who Loved Us
Bible Reading: 2 Timothy 3 – Warnings against false teachers and admonitions to faithfulness, particularly in light of the inspiration and adequacy of Scripture.
Bible Memorisation: Deuteronomy 6:5
Song: All People That On Earth Do Dwell
Bible Reading: 1 Kings 16:8-28
Sermon: Kings Behaving Badly
Song: And Can It Be
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer:
Closing Blessing
Song: Never Alone


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Straight Strokes With Crooked Sticks (preparing for MGPC 10/6/18)

Order of Service
Song: From The Day
Welcome:
Call to Worship
Song: Jerusalem
Prayer Of Confession
Song: My Hope Is Built On Nothing Less
Affirming our Faith: Westminster Shorter Catechism Q26
Song: Praise God From Whom All Blessings Flow
Bible Reading: 2 Timothy 2 – Wholehearted devotion to gospel ministry is urged through the use of the analogies of the solider, the athlete, the farmer, the workman, the vessel, and the servant.
Bible Memorisation: Deuteronomy 6:5
Song: I Praise You Lord
Bible Reading: 1 Kings 15:25-16:7
Sermon: Straight Strokes With Crooked Sticks
The Lord’s Supper (gf bread)
Song: What A Wonderful Change
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer:
Closing Blessing
Song: Your Love Defends Me


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Corporate Worship As Training Christians For Daily Life (via Ray Van Neste)

The Bible has led the Christian church to understand its corporate gatherings as directed by God, directed to God, with blessings for Christians, and a witness to unbelievers.
When the order is reversed that which God has directed for Christians to offer to him, along with the blessings they receive from obedience can be jettisoned when a reductionistic principle of communicating the Gospel to unbelievers.
When content deliver is king, elements like corporate confession lapse because unbelievers can’t relate.
But then unbelievers never witness the elements of that God directed his people to offer to him, they never witness the blessings and benefits that God conveys to his people.
In making the Gospel central, the fullness of the Gospel as Christians are meant to experience it is impoverished on the grounds of inconvenience.

From Ray Van Neste:

A guided time of corporate confession has been a staple for Christian worship through the ages though it has fallen out of use in many churches today. A basic idea behind the practice is that in order to draw near to God we must confess our sins (Psalm 66:18; Hebrews 10:22; 1 John 1:9). This reminds us again of the holiness of God, our sinfulness and the pardon available in the gospel. Without this, we too easily tend to drift into worship taking God lightly. In such confession together we experience the gospel afresh, facing our sins and receiving the cleansing forgiveness which Jesus provides. This gracious pardon is the central reason driving our worship. Even if we bring many other sorrows and burdens with us, being reminded that our greatest problem–the wrath of God because of our sins–has been dealt with will enable us to praise God.
In addition, our forebears thought of our corporate worship as training us for daily life. Thus, singing gospel truths was not a “Sunday thing” but gave us songs to sing throughout the week in order to shape our hearts and minds. The proclamation of the Word gave us truth to contemplate and apply throughout the week as well as training us to study the Bible ourselves. And the prayers modeled for us the way to pray. Thus, corporate confession of sin helped shape us into a people marked by regularly acknowledging our sins and seeking forgiveness. I am grateful that our church follows this practice for many reasons, including the fact that it is shaping me and my children. That comment from my son was an early indication that God was at work showing him his need for forgiveness. About a month after the dinner table conversation, I had the privilege of baptizing him as he had come to trust in Jesus for the forgiveness of his sins.

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Sinclair Ferguson’s Preface To Reformation Worship

When the Gospel was rediscovered at the Reformation a focus on worship accompanied it.
Paying heed to the practice of worship from the past is an insight into the impact of the Gospel on the gathered people of God.
This is based on an understanding of worship as a whole as a means of grace, something from God to us (vertical downward focused); rather than something that people are doing for God (vertical upward focused), or developing an effective content delivery system (horizontal focused) primarily to educate non-Christians.
In reality all three aspects have to be acknowledged and incorporated; and I’m sure the current horizontal obsession will mitigate over time and we’ll see less of Sunday morning as Christian TAFE and something a little more … worshipful.

Sinclair Ferguson writes an introduction to Reformation Worship, a new book on this classic subject.

This isn’t a plea for a wooden adopting, or a slavish imitation, of any or all older liturgies; nor is it an intimidating and metallic insistence that we should use them today “because the reformers used them.” That could—and almost certainly would—have a deadening effect on our worship. Most of us do not live on the continent of Europe, and none of us lives in the 16th century.
Our greatest need is for worship in Spirit as well as in truth today. But older liturgies should stimulate us to careful thought, and cause us to ask how we can apply their principles today in a way that echoes their Trinitarian, Christ-centered, biblically informed content, so that our worship, in our place and time, will echo the gospel content and rhythm they exhibit.
This is no easy task, and it requires wisdom, tact, sensitivity, and careful communication of principles and goals. But it’s also true that, at the end of the day, people tend to learn and to grow as much by experience as by verbal instructions. They need to sense and taste the help and the value of a better way. And since their appetite may have been blunted by a diet of modernity, it’s important to advance little by little.

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