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A Life Of Repentance (preparing for MGPC 22/10/17)

Song: In Tenderness
Welcome:
Call to Worship
Song: Let Your Kingdom Come
Prayer Of Confession
Song: What A Wonderful Saviour Is Jesus
Affirming our Faith: The Apostles’ Creed
Song: Now To The King Of Heaven
Bible Reading: Jonah 2:1-10 – Jonah cries out to God from the belly of the fish and the LORD delivers him.
Bible Memorisation: Mark 5:19b
Song: How Deep The Father’s Love For Us
Bible Reading: Mark 6:1-13
Sermon: A Life Of Repentance
Song: Rejoice The Lord Is King (Tithes & free will offerings will be taken up during this song. Guests are not obligated to give an offering.)
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer:
Closing Blessing
Song: Blessed Be Your Name


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A Touching Story (preparing for MGPC 15/10/17)

Song: The Saving One
Welcome:
Call to Worship
Song: In Tenderness
Prayer Of Confession
Song: Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee
Affirming our Faith: The Apostles’ Creed
Song: Now To Him Who Loved Us
Bible Reading: Jonah 1:1-17 – Jonah is called by God to preach repentance to hated Nineveh, flees instead, and is swallowed by a great fish.
Bible Memorisation: Mark 5:19b
Song: Saviour, While My Heart Is Tender
Bible Reading: Mark 5:21-43
Sermon: A Touching Story
Song: This Earth belongs To God (Tithes & free will offerings will be taken up during this song. Guests are not obligated to give an offering.)
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer:
Closing Blessing
Song: All I Have Is Christ


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Winning The Battle (preparing for MGPC 8/10/17)

Song: Jesus, Thank You
Welcome:
Call to Worship
Song: This I Believe
Prayer Of Confession
Song: God, Whose Almighty Word
Affirming our Faith: The Apostles’ Creed
Song: Worship Honour Glory Blessing
Bible Reading: Obadiah 1:1-21 – Obadiah’s prophesy is directed at the descendants of Esau, Edomites, yet sacred Scripture is given to the people of God who are meant to overhear its message. While Jerusalem lay in ruins and the evil Edomites appear to have triumphed, God asserts His sovereign purposes, promises to humble proud Edom, and restore His people.
Bible Memorisation: Mark 5:19b
Song: The Lord’s My Shepherd
Bible Reading: Mark 5:1-20
Sermon: Winning the Battle
Lords Supper: Mark Lewis
Song: Behold The Lamb (Tithes & free will offerings will be taken up during this song. Guests are not obligated to give an offering.)
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer: Alan Clarkson
Closing Blessing


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Singing Together Pushes Back Against Individualism And Says We Are A Community (via Sandra McCracken)

Sandra McCracken’s recently recorded musical works have transitioned from an individual to a collective expression.
In this interview at the Rabbit Room the interviewer asks her about the changes involved in moving to a collective and corporate voice in singing.
Her answer is interesting in terms of both song choices and the nature of singing in corporate worship.

Interviewer: You’ve said before that this group of songs — [McCracken’s recent albums] Psalms, God’s Highway, Steadfast Live — is moving away from singer-songwriter music and towards gospel songs. To me, that sounds like moving from a subjective to a collective consciousness of what it means to sing together. I’d love to hear you talk about what it means to make that shift, as well as all the out-workings of singing collectively.

Sandra: That’s an interesting question for me because my answer is always evolving. For a while I was characterizing it this way: the singer-songwriter music I’ve written for the majority of my career is comprised of narrative-based songs, as opposed to gospel or worship songs. But lately I’ve realized that the songs I’ve written and adapted from Scripture, both from the psalms and from other places, are not any less narrative-based than my singer-songwriter music. They’re just somebody else’s narrative I’m embodying. So it’s still personal, it’s still emotional, but it’s someone else’s words. I think my latest evolution of wording around that would be that there are many different kinds of narrative songs.
The idea of a collective voice holds very true for me, though, that these songs are meant to be sung together, to bring people together around common themes of loss and restoration. That is such a shared human experience. Loss is not far from us at any time. So the practice of singing together is a balm and a comfort. That’s how we experience the comfort of God: by singing together. Which is unmistakably a weird thing to do.
It seems countercultural right now in a more pronounced way than in other times of history. We’re in a time of such isolation. Even music is often experienced individually through ear buds in a private context. So the idea of singing together pushes back against that individualism and says we are a community. We’re not alone in this. It’s not bad to listen by yourself, but there’s a different kind of comfort when we walk together.

Read the rest of the interview at The Rabbit Room.


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Who, Indeed? (preparing for MGPC 1/10/17)

Daylight Saving starts today…

Song: See Him Coming
Welcome:
Call to Worship
Song: Come People Of The Risen King
Prayer Of Confession
Song: Praise To The Lord, The Almighty
Affirming our Faith: The Apostles’ Creed
Song: Praise God From Whom All Blessings Flow
Bible Reading: Amos 9:1-15 – Amos records his fifth vision of Israel’s destruction and exile (verses 1-10) yet also promises a day of restoration (verses 11-15).
Bible Memorisation: Mark 5:19b
Song: Sweet Hour Of Prayer
Bible Reading: Mark 4:35-41
Sermon: Who, Indeed?
Song: Let Children Hear The Mighty Deeds
(Tithes and free will offerings will be taken up during this song. Guests are not obligated to give an offering.)
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer:
Closing Blessing
Song: Jesus, Thank You


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Liturgy For The Non-Liturgical Christian (via Stephen McAlpine)

Watch someone with a completely scripted contemporary order of service maintain they’re non-liturgical.
Stephen McAlpine bounces off the observation that all churches have a liturgy of some sort or another, the issue is whether it conveys the reality of the Kingdom of God or is shaped as a pastiche that reflects the Kingdom of the world.
This isn’t a matter of old-fashioned or new-fashioned. It’s a matter of intent and content.
McAlpine states that good liturgy serves as a means for Christians to be re-stored and re-storied.

A sample:

Self-conscious and faithful liturgy re-stories us. We gather to hear that we are in a different story to the stories that we have been plied with all week long. We gather to hear the story that begins in a Garden and ends in a City and that has a vision of the good life and of flourishing centred around the worship of the Lamb, not the worship of the self.
Good liturgy walks us through that story. Not all of it every week. But enough of it over time that we gradually can become impervious to the alternate stories of sex, power and money that are constantly reinventing and re-presenting themselves to us in various guises. Good, self-conscious liturgy is not the sum total of what we do when we gather in various formats as church, indeed it would be strange if it were, but it must the planet at the centre that pulls everything else we do into planetary alignment.
Good liturgy becomes embedded in us so that when those lies come to us as truths, the sheer weight of the truth in us casts them aside, and we find ourselves living liturgically in the gospel due to the sheer length of time we have spent proclaiming true liturgy. Good liturgy doesn’t pretend to be all of our worship, it simply prepares us for a life of worship that is directed towards what is worthy of our worship. Good liturgy sends us out after gathering us in with a clearer sense of the story.
The decision by many churches to cut liturgy at just the time the cultural liturgies were ramping up in energy, was to the church what uni-lateral disarmament was to politics in the 1970s and 1980s.
Both are suicidal and naive.

Read the whole post at Stephen McAlpine.


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Hidden In Plain View (preparing for MGPC 24/9/17)

Song: This Is Amazing Grace
Welcome:
Call to Worship
Song: Christ Is Risen, He Is Risen Indeed
Prayer Of Confession
Song: All Things Bright And Beautiful
Affirming our Faith: The Apostles’ Creed
Song: Now To The King Of Heaven
Bible Reading: Amos 8:1-14 – Amos charges Israel with indifference to the plight of the poor, judicial corruption, and deceitful commercial practices. He warns of a coming famine for the word of the LORD.
Bible Memorisation: Mark 3:35
Song: O God Beyond All Praising
Bible Reading: Mark 4:21-34
Sermon: Hidden In Plain View
Song: Through The Love Of God Our Saviour
(Tithes & free will offerings will be taken up during this song. Guests are not obligated to give an offering.)
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer:
Closing Blessing
Song: See Him Coming