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How Best To Survive Falling Out Of A Plane Without A Parachute (via Today I Found Out)

Turns out the survival rate for falling out of a plane without a parachute may be slightly higher than that of being a Presbyterian minister in South Australia. (That’s a joke. It may be true, but it’s still a joke.)

This post on Today I Found Out is about how best to survive a parachuteless fall from great height, and a bit about some people who actually lived to tell their tales.

Most important to keep in mind is that remembering the article may fill a second or two if you ever are plummeting to your death, but surely you’ll have more important things to muse on during those final instants of your life.

Anyway:

Sure, you’re probably going to die anyway, but, hey, having something- anything- to do will help distract you from the truth that your adventure here on Earth is about to end and, no matter who you are, the fact that you ever existed will soon be forgotten- for most, in a shockingly short amount of time…
But do not go gentle into that good night my friends. Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Source


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Some Facts About June 4, 1963 That Make Me Feel Even Older

Here’s an excerpt of some facts about people born on June 4, 1963 that I found online.
I have no intention of trying to work out if they’re true.
The make me feel older.
Especially the dog years one.
There was a theory that this applied to people who were Presbyterian ministers in South Australia…

Anyway, here’s some of the facts.

Days since birth: 20,454 days
Days spent sleeping: 6,818 days
Years spent sleeping: 18.67 years
Part of life spent sleeping: 33%
Full moons since birth: 693
Next full moon: June 17 at 08:32:00 GMT – Monday
First one billion seconds: Sometime on February 10, 1995
Age in dog years: 267 dog years old using a Chinese Shar-Pei breed


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A Capital City With A Population Of Zero (via Half As Interesting)

This video about a capital city with a population of zero is not about Canberra on a long weekend.
Joking aside, it really exists (presently).


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Day-Time Fireworks In HD

This takes a while to get going, but is interesting: day-time fire-works (which I didn’t know about), slo-mo, HD (I’m getting a HD tv this year, for sure), and some goofing around.


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Bear Grylls Reviews Survival Movies

In this video from Vanity Fair, survival expert Bear Grylls gives his opinion on the plausibility of survival scenes from a variety of movies.
Grylls may seem overly generous a couple of times (I still believe there was room for Leo on the raft in Titanic) but you do learn a bit about him as he expresses the background situations that formed the basis for his opinions.


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Unreal Christian Quotes (via Trevin Wax)

Trevin Wax examines quotes wrongfully associated with various Christians.
I hadn’t heard of a couple of these quotes, but was familiar with most.
Given how often you read some of them, i.e. “You do not have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body” often attributed to C.S. Lewis, or the phrase attributed to Francis of Assisi, “Preach the gospel at all times; when necessary, use words”, it is helpful to know what is true and what is not.
Read the post at Waxs’ blog at the Gospel Coalition.


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The Benefits Of Home Libraries

Preparing Bible Studies and sermons on the book of Ecclesiastes, verse 12 in chapter 12 that kept echoing: “Of making many books there is no end, and much study is a weariness of the flesh.”
Now, I own a few books.
I’ve already posted a quote from a new one that arrived today.
So this report about the benefits of growing up in a home with books salves my conscience.
(Not that it needed much salving, admittedly.)

From a report at PacificStandard:

The results suggest those volumes made a long-term difference. “Growing up with home libraries boosts adult skills in these areas beyond the benefits accrued from parental education, or [one’s] own educational or occupational attainment,” the researchers report.
Not surprisingly, the biggest impact was on reading ability. “The total effects of home library size on literacy are large everywhere,” the researchers report.Growing up with few books in the house was associated with below-average literacy rates, while he presence of around 80 books raised those rates to the mean. Literacy continued to increase with the number of reported books up to around 350, at which point it flattened out.
Similarly, the effects of a home library on numeracy were quite significant across the board. Its impact on technological skills was smaller but also widespread.

Read the whole post here.

If you’ll excuse me, I’ve got a book to get back to.