mgpcpastor's blog


Leave a comment

A Microscopic Saviour (via Aaron Wilson)

Aaron Wilson reflects on the idea that if the incarnation of God in the birth of Jesus is an amazing idea, then the implication that God was incarnate in a collection of cells some nine months earlier is mind-boggling.

Nine months before Christmas morning, Jesus went from ruling the world in heaven with His Father and the Holy Spirit, to enter into the smallest, most dependent, most microscopic form of human life.
The God who authored a universe that can’t be measured, humbled Himself into a form that can’t be seen.
It’s a staggering thought.
The God who authored a universe that can’t be measured, humbled Himself into a form that can’t be seen.Even more mind-boggling is the fact that there was a time when the incarnate spirit of Jesus was in an embryonic human form that hadn’t yet grown eyes, fingers, a brain, or even a spinal cord.
Even Christ’s holy blood cells that would later be shed to save humanity, first had to be formed by a yolk sac inside of Mary’s womb.
In the months leading up to Christmas, Jesus—who formed the world and invented human reproduction—was Himself being formed inside one of His creations through the very blueprints He had established for human development.

HE HOLDS ALL THINGS TOGETHER
As you’re pondering these truths, consider Colossians 1:16-17 as it speaks of Jesus:
“For everything was created by him, in heaven and on earth, the visible and the invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things have been created through him and for him. He is before all things, and by him all things hold together.”
Doesn’t this truth make the incarnation all the more amazing? For a moment in time, the entire universe was being held together in the form of a microscopic, two-celled human embryo named Jesus.

Read the whole post at Facts And Trends.


Leave a comment

O Come, O Come Emmanuel (17) – Christmas Songs 2018

Josh Garrel’s Christmas/Advent album The Light Comes Down featured this recording of O Come, O Come Emmanuel.


Leave a comment

John The Baptist And Saying ‘Come Lord Jesus’ And Meaning It (via Fleming Rutledge)

Fleming Rutledge writes about John the Baptist and what she terms “apocalyptic transvision — that vision given to the church that sees through the appearances of this world to the blazing power and holiness of the coming of the Lord.”

…. It has occurred to me that the image of Jesus as the cosmic Judge who will ultimately come again to put an end to all sin and wickedness forever is not so frightening to the poor and oppressed of the earth as it is to those who have a lot to lose.
If your loved one is in the habit of buying you expensive Christmas gifts, you might not be so crazy about the idea of Jesus coming back before Santa Claus gets here. But suppose you had been a Christian in prison in the Soviet Union. Or suppose you had been a black person in Apartheid-era South Africa directed to pack up your meager belongings and take them to a so-called homeland that wasn’t your home and that wouldn’t offer you dignified employment. Suppose you were elderly and handicapped in the South Bronx and had just been robbed and terrorized for the third time. In circumstances like those, you might say Maranatha and really mean it.
Even today, John the Baptist’s lonely, austere style of life bears witness to a reality that is coming, a reality that will expose all worldly realities, all earthly conditions, all human promises as fraudulent and transitory. His appearance on the scene at this time of year exposes our pretensions for what they really are. Never have we needed him more!

Read the whole post at Christianity Today.


Leave a comment

O Come, O Come Emmanuel (12) – Christmas Songs 2018

This version of O Come, O Come Emmanuel is by vocal duo Shane and Shane.
It took me a second or two to adjust to just how high the vocals are at the start.


Leave a comment

O Come, O Come Emmanuel (10) – Christmas Songs 2018

Today we add a male a capella version of O Come, O Come Emmanuel for Pitch Perfect fans out there.
I’ll look around for a female version.


Leave a comment

The Ache For Peace (via Winn Collier)

Winn Collier writes about the longing that Advent epitomises, a Gospel fuelled desire for the fulfilment of redemption.
We have peace, and long for peace. We have hope, and long for that expectation to be fully realised.
From Collier:

I’m aching for peace.
To be sure, I’m not angling for anything easy or contrived or oblivious – that’s not peace; that’s avoidance. But I do want an end to relational hostility. I do want the hungry fed and the oppressed to be free. I do want enemies to become friends, or at least not to hate one another. I do want that inner quiet that marks the way of wisdom: the capacity to live in tensions, the courage to refuse the rage of the moment, the open-heartedness that allows us to be surprised, the tenacity to never lose hope.

Read his full devotional here.


Leave a comment

O Come, O Come Emmanuel (5) – Christmas Songs 2018

Ordinary Time are an acoustic/folk trio.
O Come, O Come Emmanuel featured on Good News, their fifth album released in 2016.