mgpcpastor's blog


Leave a comment

Wise Living In Foolish Times (preparing for MGPC 9/12/2018)

Song: No Other Name
Welcome:
Call to Worship
Song: In Tenderness
Prayer Of Confession
Song: Be Still My Soul
Affirming our Faith: New City Catechism 49
Song: Now To The King Of Heaven
Bible Reading: 2 Thessalonians 1 – Salutations, greetings, and the promise of Christ’s saving and avenging return.
Bible Memorisation: Psalm 16:8-9
Song: Tell Out My Soul
Bible Reading: Ecclesiastes 9:13-10:20
Sermon: Wise Living In Foolish Times
Lord’s Supper
Song: I Cannot Tell
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer:
Closing Blessing
Song: The Love Of The Father


Leave a comment

Living Without All The Answers (preparing for MGPC 2/12/2018)

Song: Saviour Of The World
Welcome:
Song: Saved My Soul
Prayer Of Confession
Song: O Come, O Come Emmanuel
Affirming our Faith: New City Catechism 27
Song: Now To Him Who Loved Us
Bible Reading: 1 Thessalonians 5:12-28 – The Apostle Paul provides final instructions (vv 12-22) and prays for the Thessalonians as he concludes his epistle (vv 23-28)
Bible Memorisation:
Song: Saviour, Like A Shepherd Lead Us
Bible Reading: Ecclesiastes 8:1 – 9:12
Sermon: Living Without All The Answers
Song: Hark! The Herald Angel Sings
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer:
Closing Blessing
Song: Never Alone


Leave a comment

An Expositor Doesn’t Merely Preach From A Text Or On A Text. An Expositor Preaches The Text. (via Jason Allen)

Some thoughts from Jason Allen about expository preaching.
If you’re at church tomorrow listen for the message of God’s word, not some words that use God’s word to impart a speaker’s message.

… “preaching the word” is marked by these three essentials:
1. The necessity of accurately interpreting the text in its immediate, and broader, biblical context.
2. The necessity of the main point of the sermon and the sermon’s sub-points to be derived from the text.
3. The necessity of the sermon’s application to come from the text and for the text to be brought to bear on the congregation.
These three marks are, admittedly, minimalistic, but they are essential. They are found where an expository sermon is to be found. Consequentially, expository preaching may be much more than this, but it mustn’t be anything less than this.
So, how do you know if a sermon is an expository one?
Is the text accurately interpreted, with consideration given to both its immediate and broader biblical contexts?
Are the main point of the sermon and its sub-points derived from the text?
Does the sermon’s application come from the text and is the text being brought to bear on the congregation?
An expositor doesn’t merely preach from a text or on a text. An expositor preaches the text.

Read the whole post here.


Leave a comment

Many Schemes (preparing for MGPC 25/11/2018)

Song: No Other Name
Welcome:
Song: This Is Amazing Grace
Prayer Of Confession
Song: Because He Lives
Affirming our Faith: New City Catechism 27
Song: May The Grace Of Christ Our Saviour
Bible Reading: 1 Thessalonians 5:1-11 – The Apostle Paul teaches the church regarding “the day of the Lord” (vv 1-11), provides final instructions (vv 12-22), and prays for the Thessalonians as he concludes his epistle (vv 2328)
Bible Memorisation: Ecclesiastes 5:10
Song: How I Love To Trust In Jesus
Bible Reading: Ecclesiastes 7:15-29
Sermon: Many Schemes
Song: Jesus Calls Us O’er The Tumult
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer:
Closing Blessing
Song: Never Alone


Leave a comment

We Attend Church Not Primarily As Consumers To Experience A Product, But As Worshippers To Exalt God And Edify His People (via Matt Merker)

In an age and a culture that expects polish and encourages perfectionism, the tendency to import these values into worship is at best seen as a ‘bait and switch’ tactic of appealing to the non-Christian’s expectations in order to introduce them to Jesus.
There is a legitimate aim in that desire.
But unrelenting exposure to that culture must shape and form the values and expectations of Christians eventually.
If the medium is the message, what does ‘professional’ standard worship in a darkened room shape.
From Matt Merker:

We live in an age of production. We’ve learned to value and expect polished professionalism from the various interactions that make up our daily lives, from the television shows we watch to our “customer experience” at the local Starbucks.
I call these expectations “consumer intuitions.” They’re not necessarily bad or wrong. But we must beware lest we let these intuitions dictate how we approach church gatherings. We attend church not primarily as consumers to experience a product, but as worshipers to exalt God and edify his people.
+++
Of course, I’m not saying that we should aim for mediocrity in our church services, or that pastors should encourage members to serve in areas in which they’re obviously not gifted. My point is not for us to pursue clumsiness, but merely to embrace it when it occurs.
And I’m not against “excellence” per se. It simply depends on what we mean by excellence. Yes, it honors God to serve him with our whole heart. Doing all things for his glory (1 Corinthians 10:31) means stewarding our God-given gifts as well as we can. It means resisting sloppiness. Church musicians would do well to emulate the Levitical singers who were renowned for being “skillful” (1 Chronicles 25:7).
Pursuing excellence in serving, facilitating, and accompanying the worship of God’s people is one thing. But if by “excellence” we mean professional-level production quality, I fear it reveals that our consumer intuitions have snuck into our churches.

Read the whole post at Desiring God.


Leave a comment

Enjoying God Together (via David Mathis at Desiring God)

Being part of God’s family is belonging to God. Together.
From David Mathis at Desiring God.

In corporate worship, we gather together expectantly, reminding ourselves that God is our giving Father. This is who he is. This is what he loves. God delights in cheerful givers because he himself is one. This is what he produces in the hearts of his people. Not dutiful, reluctant, obligatory worship, but willing, eager, cheerful praise. The kind of worship that comes to him as a rewarder, not a killjoy. As a treasure, not a troll. As the great satisfier of our souls, not as a slavemaster conscripting our service.
How might it change corporate worship for you to scan the room and think, “These men and women around me, of all ages, not only believe in the truth of Christianity but they enjoy the God of Christianity”?
As we sing, we are enjoying Jesus together. As we pray, we are enjoying him together. As we hear his word read and preached, we are uniting our hearts together in the God who himself, in the person of his Son, became one of us, and lived among us, and suffered with us, and died for us, and rose triumphantly from the grave, and now sits in power — with all authority in heaven and on earth — at his Father’s right hand bringing to pass, in his perfect patience and perfect timing, all his purposes in our world. For our everlasting joy. Together.

Read the whole post here.


Leave a comment

A Few Words (preparing for MGPC 4/11/18)

Song: Saviour Of The World
Welcome:
Call to Worship
Song: This I Believe
Prayer Of Confession
Song: For All The Saints
Affirming our Faith: New City Catechism 27
Song: Now To The King Of Heaven
Bible Reading: 1 Thessalonians 3:6-13 – The Apostle Paul explains the certainty of Christian suffering and prays for the Thessalonians’ growth in love and holiness.
Bible Memorisation: Ecclesiastes 5:10
Song: Praise The Lord, Let All Within Me
Bible Reading: Ecclesiastes 5: 1-7
Sermon: A Few Words
Song: All Who Would Valiant Be
Announcements:
Pastoral Prayer:
Closing Blessing
Song: Your Love So High