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He Who Has Said, ‘It Is Finished,’ Will Never Leave Anything Undone (via Charles Spurgeon)

Tomorrow, for those of us who have not been called home, the work of our salvation will continue toward its completion:
From Charles Spurgeon, quoted at Tolle Lege:

If, when we were sinners, Christ loved us so as to die for us, now that He has redeemed us, and has already reconciled us to Himself, and made us His friends and His disciples, will He not finish the work that is necessary to make us fit to stand among the golden lamps of heaven, and to sing His praises in the country where nothing that defileth can even enter?
I believe it, my brethren. He who has said, ‘It is finished,’ will never leave anything undone. It shall never be said of Him, ‘This Man began, but was not able to finish.’

source


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Still A Great Salvation? (via Sinclair Ferguson)

A salvation that is eternal in scope, personal in application, and expresses the character of God.
It is not wonder the Scriptures describe it as great.
Sinclair Ferguson wonders how a salvation that embraces the past, present, and future could ever be taken for granted:

So it is in the Gospel. God has a plan. It has been called the covenant of redemption, or the covenant of peace (pactum salutis). Theologians as great as Thomas Boston and Jonathan Edwards have disagreed as to whether the plan should properly be described as a covenant at all. But the debates over nomenclature are incidental to the thing itself.
The triune God had a plan, involving the mutual commitment of Father, Son and Spirit to save a people. About this the reformed theologians speak with one voice.
Before all time; prior to all worlds; when there was nothing “outside of” God himself; when the Father, Son and Spirit found eternal, absolute and unimaginable blessing, pleasure and joy in their holy triunity — it was their agreed purpose to create a world which would fall, and in unison — but at infinitely great cost — to bring you (if you are a believer) grace and salvation. This deeper grace from before the dawn of time — pictured in the rituals, the leaders and the experiences of the Old Testament saints (cf. Heb. 11:39–12:3) — is now ours. These are the dimensions of what the author of Hebrews calls “such a great salvation” (Heb. 2:3). Our salvation depends on God’s covenant, rooted in eternity in the plan of the Trinity, foreshadowed in the Mosaic covenant, fulfilled in Christ, enduring forever. No wonder Hebrews calls it “great.”
You considered your salvation to be “great” early in your Christian life didn’t you? Do you still think about it that way today?

From Ligonier blog.


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Seeing The Father In Cross (via Noel Due and Daniel Bush)

The unity of the Godhead means that any depiction of the Cross that paints Jesus as the one who protects us from the Father profoundly misrepresents the character of God.
From Noel Due and Daniel Bush:

The cross is the point at which God exposed our delusions – our wanting to be judge – and announces his judgment on such sin. At the same time, he simultaneously took that same judgement upon himself in Christ. In other words, Jesus doesn’t block the Father’s wrath due to us, but bears it for us in order to bring the Father’s love. In this specific sense the cross isn’t only Christ’s, it’s also the Father’s. It’s the event in which his heart for us is most thoroughly seen: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son. … For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him” (John 3: 16,17). Jesus never sought to appease a distant and angry Father.

Embracing God As Father, Daniel Bush & Noel Due, Lexham Press, 2015, pg. 64


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Why’d You Give Me This, God? (via Adam 4d)

I appreciate a lot of this webtoon’s posts, but really liked this one.

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Salvation Is All God’s Doing (via David Cook)

The second in a three-part series on vital issues in systematic theology by David Cook, current moderator-general of the Presbyterian Church of Australia.

Do I contribute to my own salvation? Do I repent and believe and thus God regenerates me or is it the other way around? Is faith my contribution to the whole process – God does his bit and I add my necessary contribution?
This, of course, goes to the heart of the gospel we preach.
Recently I found myself singing a song in our choral group. It said “time after time, He has waited before and now He is waiting again; to see if you’re willing to open the door. O how He wants to come in.” Really, that I can hold at bay the sovereign Lord of all, the one who called creation into being, now held at bay by little old me.
Calvin said, “the first principle of theology is that God can see nothing in the corrupt nature of man … to induce him to show him favour!” God never relates to us on the basis of our desiring or earning.
Salvation begins with God’s decision not mine. It is gracious, effective and powerful. It is not earned or attracted by me. It is entirely generous and contrary to our deserving. I cannot earn it, be religious enough or good enough to deserve it.
This truth gives the lie to every human attempt to impress God or win his attention by our doing. All who will be in heaven will be there in total praise of God; they will not share the limelight with Him.
So, how does salvation begin and proceed?… (Read the rest here).


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Passing The Test

Douglas Wilson tells a story that sounds like a joke, but the punchline is eternally true.

Once there was a Presbyterian minister who had made the whole topic of sola fide his special field of study. He had mastered the subject, as far as any mortal man can be said to have mastered anything. After a long and fruitful ministry, he eventually did what all Presbyterian ministers do, which is to say, he died.
As he approached the pearly gates, he was mildly surprised to see that St. Peter was there, just like in all the jokes. But he was, he thought, prepared to roll with it because, after all, he was going to Heaven.
Right next to St. Peter was a long wooden table, of the kind you see in examination rooms. A chair was pulled out for him, and on the table was a thick test, and a pencil next to it. As he walked up to St. Peter, he was greeted warmly and the set-up was explained to him.
“We have prepared a small fifty-page test for you,” Peter said. “Because we believe in grace, we decided to prepare a test for you that is right in your wheelhouse. This entire test is dedicated to the subject of sola fide, a subject you have been studying for forty years, I understand. If you get a perfect score, you may enter into joy.” With that pronouncement, Peter handed the pencil to the minister, and gestured to the waiting chair.
The minister held the pencil for a moment, thinking about it, and then quietly, without a word, he handed the pencil back.
A smile played around the corner of St. Peter’s mouth. “You pass,” he said.