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Still A Great Salvation? (via Sinclair Ferguson)

A salvation that is eternal in scope, personal in application, and expresses the character of God.
It is not wonder the Scriptures describe it as great.
Sinclair Ferguson wonders how a salvation that embraces the past, present, and future could ever be taken for granted:

So it is in the Gospel. God has a plan. It has been called the covenant of redemption, or the covenant of peace (pactum salutis). Theologians as great as Thomas Boston and Jonathan Edwards have disagreed as to whether the plan should properly be described as a covenant at all. But the debates over nomenclature are incidental to the thing itself.
The triune God had a plan, involving the mutual commitment of Father, Son and Spirit to save a people. About this the reformed theologians speak with one voice.
Before all time; prior to all worlds; when there was nothing “outside of” God himself; when the Father, Son and Spirit found eternal, absolute and unimaginable blessing, pleasure and joy in their holy triunity — it was their agreed purpose to create a world which would fall, and in unison — but at infinitely great cost — to bring you (if you are a believer) grace and salvation. This deeper grace from before the dawn of time — pictured in the rituals, the leaders and the experiences of the Old Testament saints (cf. Heb. 11:39–12:3) — is now ours. These are the dimensions of what the author of Hebrews calls “such a great salvation” (Heb. 2:3). Our salvation depends on God’s covenant, rooted in eternity in the plan of the Trinity, foreshadowed in the Mosaic covenant, fulfilled in Christ, enduring forever. No wonder Hebrews calls it “great.”
You considered your salvation to be “great” early in your Christian life didn’t you? Do you still think about it that way today?

From Ligonier blog.


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Westminster Shorter Catechism – Lord’s Day 22

Westminster Shorter Catechism – Lord’s Day 22

Q & A 37
Q What benefits do believers receive from Christ at death?
A The souls of believers are at their death made perfect in holiness,1 and do immediately pass into glory;2 and their bodies, being still united in Christ,3 do rest in their graves, till the resurrection.4

Q & A 38
Q What benefits do believers receive from Christ at the resurrection?
A. At the resurrection, believers, being raised up in glory,5 shall be openly acknowledged and acquitted in the day of judgment,6 and made perfectly blessed in the full enjoying of God7 to all eternity.8

*1 Hebrews 12:23.
*2 Luke 23:43; 2 Corinthians 5:6, 8; Philippians 1:23.
*3 1 Thessalonians 4:14.
*4 Daniel 12:2; John 5:28-29; Acts 24:15.
*5 1 Corinthians 15:42-43
*6 Matthew 25:33-34, 46
*7 Romans 8:29; 1 John 3:2.
*8 Psalm 16:11; 1 Thessalonians 4:17.


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Westminster Shorter Catechism – Lord’s Day 21

Westminster Shorter Catechism – Lord’s Day 21

Q & A 36
Q What are the benefits which in this life do accompany or flow from justification, adoption, and sanctification?
A The benefits which in this life do accompany or flow from justification, adoption, and sanctification, are, assurance of God’s love,1 peace of conscience,2 joy in the Holy Ghost,3 increase of grace,4 and perseverance therein to the end.*5

*1 Romans 5:5.
*2 Romans 5:1.
*3 Romans 14:17.
*4 2 Peter 3:18.
*5 Philippians 1:6; 1 Peter 1:5.


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Westminster Shorter Catechism – Lord’s Day 13

Westminster Shorter Catechism – Lord’s Day 13

Q & A 23
Q What offices does Christ execute as our Redeemer?
A Christ, as our Redeemer, executes the offices of a prophet,1 of a priest,2 and of a king,*3 both in his estate of humiliation and exaltation.

Q & A 24
Q How does Christ execute the office of a prophet?
A Christ executes the office of a prophet, in revealing to us, by his Word4 and Spirit,5 the will of God for our salvation.*6

Q & A 25
Q How does Christ execute the office of a priest?
A Christ executes the office of a priest, in his once offering up of himself a sacrifice to satisfy divine justice,7 and reconcile us to God,8 and in making continual intercession for us.*9

Q & A 26
Q How does Christ execute the office of a king?
A Christ executes the office of a king, in subduing us to himself, in ruling and defending us,10 and in restraining and conquering all his and our enemies.11

*1 Deuteronomy 18:18; Acts 2:33; Acts 3:22-23; Hebrews 1:1-2.
*2 Hebrews 4:14-15; Hebrews 5:5-6.
*3 Isaiah 9:6-7; Luke 1:32-33; 1 Corinthians 15:25.
*4 Luke 4:18-19, 21; Acts 1:1-2; Hebrews 2:3.
*5 John 15:26-27; Acts 1:8; 1 Peter 1:11.
*6 John 4:41-42; John 20:30-31.
*7 Isaiah 53; Acts 8:32-35; Hebrews 9:26-28; Hebrews 10:12.
*8 Romans 5:10-11; 2 Corinthians 5:18; Colossians 1:21-22.
*9 Romans 8:34; Hebrews 7:25; Hebrews 9:24.
*10 Psalm 110:3; Matthew 28:18-20; John 17:2; Colossians 1:13.
*11 Psalm 2:6-9; Psalm 110:1-2;. Matthew 12:28; 1 Corinthians 15:24-26; Colossians 2:15.


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The Anger Of Grace – Where God’s Justice And God’s Mercy Meet (via Paul Tripp)

An excerpt from a post by Paul Tripp at Liberate:

The Anger of Grace
Let’s be very clear. God’s anger is the anger of grace. It isn’t the violent anger of unbridled and unrighteous fury. God’s anger always works to right what’s wrong. That’s what grace does. This gracious anger has two sides to it: justice and mercy. In the gracious anger of justice, God works to punish wrong, but he does even more. God isn’t satisfied merely with punishing wrong. His hunger for right is so strong that he will not relent until wrong has been completely destroyed. He will not rest until evil is no more and justice and righteousness reign forever and ever!
There is also another side to his gracious anger. It’s the anger of mercy. In mercy he works to convict—that is, to produce in us a sorrow for the wrongs that we think, say, and do. In mercy he works to forgive—that is, to clear our moral debt. In mercy he works to empower—that is, to give us everything we need to resist wrong and to do what’s right. And in mercy he works to deliver. He won’t be satisfied until every microbe of sin is completely eradicated from every cell of the heart of every one of his children.
Where do we see both sides of God’s anger coming together in one moment? On that hill outside the city gates where Jesus hung. That’s where we see justice and mercy kiss. As he hung there, Jesus bore the full weight of the justice of God’s anger. He paid the penalty our sin required. And on the cross Jesus became the instrument of God’s merciful anger that every sinner needs. He purchased our forgiveness.

Read the whole post here.