mgpcpastor's blog


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Early Father’s Day In A Snap

It was inevitable that my kids would figure out a wonderful early Father’s Day present.


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Elsa Cake

Auntie Rachel’s birthday cake for Felicity improves on Disney’s design with the addition of a specially requested unicorn.


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Practically Perfect In Every Way

My daughter Christine holding her Mary Poppins POP figurine birthday present. Someone who’s practically perfect in every way, holding a POP figure.


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Clever Girls

My wife and I saw Ladies In Black today.
It’s the cinematic adaption of novel The Women In Black.
The movie sort of acknowledges the fact that if you leave a life story at particular point then you achieve a happy ending, but life always goes on beyond that point and happiness is never guaranteed.
Actor Noni Hazelhurst, with sublime craft, restraint and warmth delivers the words which are the thematic climax of the tale.
As someone blessed to marry a clever girl, and then for us to be further blessed with three clever girls, it warmed my heart.
This is the version from the novel, which differs slightly, but conveys the substance of the idea.

You’re a clever girl, I could see that. It’s a pleasure to work with you and I’ll be sorry when you leave us. You’ll be going to the university, won’t you, of course you will. A clever girl is the most wonderful thing in all Creation you know: you must never forget that. People expect men to be clever. They expect girls to be stupid or at least silly, which very few girls really are, but most girls oblige them by acting like it. So you just go away and be as clever as ever you can; put their noses out of joint for them. It’s the best thing you could possibly do, you and all the clever girls in this city and the world.


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Fatherhood

When talking about fatherhood no one mentions traveling a long distance (twice) to see a play in the company of adult children (for the second time) affectionately based in the universe of a series of books and movies that you’ve never read or seen.

And that you’ll love the experience of sharing your children’s lives way beyond their childhood.

And the simple joy it is to be a character in their stories.

That’s fatherhood.

#puffstheplayau


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Birthday Pie

Took my middle daughter out for lunch as an early celebration of her birthday (I’ll be away on the actual day taking a few days away with my oldest daughter). Nothings says Birthday like pie. Pizza pie in this case. She chose both. It was her birthday. I followed it with a vanilla slice, a true celebration.


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“A System Of Perfectionist Teenage Girls”

This article in Melbourne’s Age newspaper caught my eye.
It’s an interview with Claire Shipman and Katty Kay authors of a book called The Confidence Code: The Science and Art of Self-Assurance – What Women Should Know.
Part of the article deals with what they describe as a “system we’ve all set up is one that creates this army of young girl perfectionists.”
The rationale behind it is explained in these terms:

Not surprisingly, it’s a mix of nature and nurture. It does seem that girls’ and boys’ brains develop a little differently. Girls, especially at puberty, start to really have much higher emotional intelligence than boys. They did before, but this is the time they double down. It leads girls to be more cautious, and boys don’t have that. Boys get a big boost of testosterone, stuff that encourages risk-taking. You build confidence by taking risks and struggling and failing and eventually mastering something. You need to be taking action to build confidence. But the system we’ve all set up is one that creates this army of young girl perfectionists.
From preschool through university, it’s all about sitting still, colouring within the lines, doing more than expected, trying to please teacher. So they don’t take risks, fail, mess up. There’s this whole conversation about boys struggling academically. But that means in the real world they know what to do. They’re learning lessons about taking risks, so they’re more ready to try something.
We were really struck by this idea of how is this happening with young women. They are outperforming boys academically. Then they enter the work world, and their confidence plummets. They’re just not learning it’s okay to take risks and fail.

The takeaway is setting up mechanisms for encouraging both girls and boys to learn from failure.

Read the interview here.