mgpcpastor's blog


Leave a comment

“A System Of Perfectionist Teenage Girls”

This article in Melbourne’s Age newspaper caught my eye.
It’s an interview with Claire Shipman and Katty Kay authors of a book called The Confidence Code: The Science and Art of Self-Assurance – What Women Should Know.
Part of the article deals with what they describe as a “system we’ve all set up is one that creates this army of young girl perfectionists.”
The rationale behind it is explained in these terms:

Not surprisingly, it’s a mix of nature and nurture. It does seem that girls’ and boys’ brains develop a little differently. Girls, especially at puberty, start to really have much higher emotional intelligence than boys. They did before, but this is the time they double down. It leads girls to be more cautious, and boys don’t have that. Boys get a big boost of testosterone, stuff that encourages risk-taking. You build confidence by taking risks and struggling and failing and eventually mastering something. You need to be taking action to build confidence. But the system we’ve all set up is one that creates this army of young girl perfectionists.
From preschool through university, it’s all about sitting still, colouring within the lines, doing more than expected, trying to please teacher. So they don’t take risks, fail, mess up. There’s this whole conversation about boys struggling academically. But that means in the real world they know what to do. They’re learning lessons about taking risks, so they’re more ready to try something.
We were really struck by this idea of how is this happening with young women. They are outperforming boys academically. Then they enter the work world, and their confidence plummets. They’re just not learning it’s okay to take risks and fail.

The takeaway is setting up mechanisms for encouraging both girls and boys to learn from failure.

Read the interview here.


Leave a comment

The Days Are Long, But The Years Are Short (via Sarah Condon)

Though parenting young children can be the most demanding of seasons in a person’s life, it is also a time that our minds return to with an increasing fondness as the years pass.
Sarah Condon writes an essay on The Work Of Love which is parenting:

It is hard to recognise that you are in the sweetest time of your life when you are in it. People often say to young parents that “the days are long, but the years are short.” They are right. In a very short time my children will be adolescents, and then teenagers, and then I will have one very quiet house. I know that there are happy years beyond these. But for some holy reason, these are the years we return to in our memories, even decades later. I am convinced that the work of love we do stays with us no matter how much time has past.

Sarah Condon, Churchy, Mockingbird, 2016, pg 59.


Leave a comment

A Musical Evening

Listening to my daughter and her cohort performing with their music school.

Especially looking forward to an ensemble rendition of ‘Tears In Heaven’.


Leave a comment

Cat Party by Koo Koo Kanga Roo

Cat Party plays at our house sometimes.
‘Bring your cat, and something to share.’


Leave a comment

Giving Is Better – A Little Arrow Kid’s Song

This is a charming seven minute video in which Clarence the Fox finds out the way to get what he wants is very different from how he expected to attain it.
Share with your younger folk.


Leave a comment

Imagine What It’s Like With Number Five

Lunarbaboon makes a point that increases with frequency.
Grandchildren are another matter altogether, however.


Leave a comment

O You Terror

Parents, view this.
Let the hearers understand.
This must have done the rounds last year, but I missed it.