Picking up Will Willimon’s position that modernity has overly individualised and psychologised contemporary pastoral Zac Hicks points out a primary purpose of corporate worship, the neglect of which weakens both worship and pastoral care. When we hear “pastoral care,” we typically think of one-on-one, gut-wrenching meetings between a pastor and a hurting congregant. We think …

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Zac Hicks on corporate worship as true mission activity, perhaps in contrast to being evangelistic activity. The symbiotic relationship between worship and mission means, first of all, that it would be unthinkable to ever replace corporate, gathered worship with missional acts of evangelism and community service, just as it would be unthinkable to remove a …

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Week by week worship is informed by a long-term desire to grow the theological health of the congregation by a balanced and comprehensive use of sources. There is a temptation in our jobs to operate solely within the week-to-week grind. Many pressures (some of them beyond us) make it hard for us to step out …

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Zac Hicks writes about corporate worship training and equipping disciples of Jesus for their day to day life following Christ. Part of [the church Hicks was attending at the time] weekly service structure was a rehearsal of repentance, a Confession of Sin and an Assurance of Pardon. Week in and week out, we would have …

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Corporate worship not as individual experience in the gathered body, or as common experience among the many, but as a shared experience that reveals the relationships and community that exist in Christ. From Zac Hicks’ The Worship Pastor: Part of loving the church well is reminding her that she is a community. in our day …

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