A thoughtful piece by Rory Shiner about the differences between nominalism and secularism and how the worshipping church responds differently to each. The observation that nominalism (people who identify as Christian without meaningfully following Jesus, while following a form of traditional church observance) and secularism (people who don’t identify as Christian or followers of Jesus, …

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Sometimes I feel the effective Christian life is confined to one personality type. Or, at the very least, that it’s not fair that one personality type seems ideally suited for reaching out. Sammy Rhodes gives some relief with an observation that the Good News is embodied in a community of all types of people. One …

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Thom Rainer features a post dealing with one of the reservations Christians have about additional church services or congregational growth. It runs along the line of “We can’t add another service! We won’t know everyone.” or “We’re dividing the church?” One of the observations about that which Rainer offers is: There are often unarticulated and …

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Mez McConnell writes frankly about a Christian culture that won’t invest in reaching hard places, but encourages people and churches to spend money based on sentiment or experience for little real return. From his post. Let’s not think too deeply about the fact that the Western evangelical money machine basically runs the most sophisticated and …

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Gary Millar reflects that in contemporary culture, making the idea that a local church is ‘just like you’ as central to its efforts to reach out into the community is no longer effective. His conclusion: Ultimately, the gospel itself is the Unique Selling Proposition (USP) of Christianity. God in Christ has made it possible through …

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Mez McConnell reflects on Jesus observation about wealth being an obstruction to entering the kingdom of God and the implications of that for evangelism and church planting: The Danger of Wealth Jesus said it’s easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom …

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