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Miracles Leaning On Lampposts

The quotes from Harvey:

From the cab driver: After this he’ll be a perfectly normal human being and you know what stinkers they are.

From Dr. Chumley: Fly specks, fly specks! I’ve been spending my life among fly specks while miracles have been leaning on lampposts at 18th and Fairfax!

From Elwood: Miss Kelly, you know, when you wear my flower you make it beautiful.

If you want any more, you’ll have to watch it for yourself.


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What If ‘Rich’ Did Not Have To Mean ‘Wealthy’, And ‘Whole’ Did Not Have To Mean ‘Healed’? (via Kate Bowler)

Kate Bowler writes of a life with stage four cancer and her encounters with a strand of Christianity that has confused the eternal biblical promises of the Gospel with variations of contemporary prosperity.
If you attend a church tomorrow I how you will hear the good news, not be told Jesus died and rose so you can get stuff.

“What would it mean for Christians to give up that little piece of the American Dream that says, “You are limitless”? Everything is not possible. The mighty kingdom of God is not yet here. What if ‘rich’ did not have to mean ‘wealthy’, and ‘whole’ did not have to mean ‘healed’? What if being the people of “the gospel” meant that we are simply people with good news? God is here. We are loved. It is enough.”
― Kate Bowler, Everything Happens for a Reason: And Other Lies I’ve Loved


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“A Humble Man Is Willing To Have His Name And Gifts Eclipsed”: Thomas Watson

Tolle Lege is a site that features quotes from various Christian writers through the ages.
Here’s one from Thomas Watson that I quite liked.

“A humble man is willing to have his name and gifts eclipsed so that God’s glory may be increased. He is content to be outshined by others in gifts and esteem, so that the crown of Christ may shine the brighter.
This is the humble man’s motto, ‘Let me decrease, let Christ increase.’ It is his desire that Christ should be exalted, and if this be thus effected, whoever is the instrument, he rejoices.
‘Some preach Christ out of envy,’ (Phil. 1:17). They preached to take away some of Paul’s hearers. ‘Well,’ says he, ‘Christ is preached, and I therein do rejoice,’ (1:18).
A humble Christian is content to be laid aside if God has any other tools to work with which may bring Him more glory.”

–Thomas Watson, The Godly Man’s Picture Drawn with a Scripture-Pencil (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1666/2003), 81.

Source


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Becoming The Monster In Your Closet (via J.D. Vance)

A discomforting point of clarity from J.D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy.
Vance’s complex and ongoing relationship with his mother had been marred by her addictions and psychological disfunction.
As an adult in his own relationships he was noting a tendency.
And it caused him great fear.

…I’d scream and I’d yell. I’d do all of the hateful things that my mother had done. And then I’d feel guilty and desperately afraid. For so much of my life, I’d made Mom out to be a kind of villain. And now I was acting like her. Nothing compares to the fear that you’re becoming the monster in your closet.

Hillbilly Elegy; J.D. Vance; William Collins, London; pg 224.


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The Singularity Of The Crucifixion Of Christ (via Fleming Rutledge)

The cross is no benign decoration for wall or jewelry.
It is a sign of shame and scandal.
And it might have passed from human notice except for particular crucifixion over two thousand years ago.
From Fleming Rutledge:
We can begin with the oddity of the universally recognized signifier, “the crucifixion.” It will help us to understand the uniqueness of Jesus’ death if we can grasp the idiosyncrasy of this manner of speaking. There have been many famous deaths in world history; we might think of John F. Kennedy, or Marie Antionette, or Cleopatra, but we do not refer to :the assassination,” “the guillotining,” or “the poisoning.” Such references would be incomprehensible. The use of the term “the crucifixion,” for the execution of Jesus show that it still retains a privileged status. When we speak of “the crucifixion,” even in the secular age, many people will know what is meant. There is something in the strange death of the man identified as Son of God that continues to command special attention. This death, this execution, above and beyond all others continues to have universal reverberations. Of no other death in human history can this be said. The cross of Jesus stands alone in this regard; it is sui generis. There were many thousands of crucifixions in Roman times, but only the crucifixion of Jesus is remembered as having any significance at all, let alone world-transforming significance.

Fleming Rutledge, The Crucifixion – Understanding The Death Of Jesus Christ Eerdmans, Grand Rapids MI, 2015, pg 3.


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Growing By Grace Where We Are

“The Great Master Gardener, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, in a wonderful providence with his own hand, planted me here, where by his grace, in this part of his vineyard, I grow; and here I will abide till the great master of the vineyard think fit to transplant me.”
Samuel Rutherford, The Loveliness Of Christ: Selections From Samuel Rutherford’s Letters, Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 2007, pg 1.
As quoted in The Imperfect Pastor, Zack Eswine, Crossway, 2015, pg 86.


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Kiss The Wave

Charles Spurgeon, as quoted by David Cook in a sermon this afternoon:
“I have learned to kiss the wave that throws me against the Rock of Ages.”
The subjective experience of adversity brings us into contact with the objective experience of God and his gracious love.