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See The Man – Sunday Songs

See The Man is from EMU Music’s 2008 album Advent.
Trevor Hodge’s lyrics and melody proclaim truth steadily in the verses and soaringly in the chorus.

The lyrics:
1.
See the man formed by the Father’s hand
Dust turned to flesh, filled with his breath in the image of God
Loved and blessed, given the very best
Destined to rule, fill and subdue all of the earth
But death entered the day he ate from the tree
Condemned all of mankind to follow his lead
But one day a man will come and undo what we had done
One day a Saviour will return
2.
See the man leaving his Father’s land
Sent by the Lord, journeys towards a promised place
By his faith would come a nation great
In numbers surpassed, all of the stars shining in space
His name would be renowned from the east to the west
And all people on earth through him would be blessed
And one day a man will come to finish what had begun
One day a Saviour would return
3.
See the man come from his Father’s side
His word become flesh and all his fullness dwelling in him
God’s delight speaking the words of life
The kingdom’s revealed, the broken are healed, the blind given sight
And for all history’s sin the righteous is slain
By his blood death is destroyed, he’s risen again
And soon he will come again and then forever reign
One day our Saviour will return

Words and Music: Trevor Hodge.
© 2008 Trevor Hodge


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One Of Us from EMU Music

EMU Music are releasing some older material as Youtube clips.
One Of Us is from the album Advent.
I don’t think it lends itself to congregational song, at least in this arrangement.
It’s composed by Nicky Chiswell, the vocals were sung by someone else who I can’t place.
I don’t think it was Sarah?
I’ll look the at the CD when I’m in my other study.


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John The Baptist And Saying ‘Come Lord Jesus’ And Meaning It (via Fleming Rutledge)

Fleming Rutledge writes about John the Baptist and what she terms “apocalyptic transvision — that vision given to the church that sees through the appearances of this world to the blazing power and holiness of the coming of the Lord.”

…. It has occurred to me that the image of Jesus as the cosmic Judge who will ultimately come again to put an end to all sin and wickedness forever is not so frightening to the poor and oppressed of the earth as it is to those who have a lot to lose.
If your loved one is in the habit of buying you expensive Christmas gifts, you might not be so crazy about the idea of Jesus coming back before Santa Claus gets here. But suppose you had been a Christian in prison in the Soviet Union. Or suppose you had been a black person in Apartheid-era South Africa directed to pack up your meager belongings and take them to a so-called homeland that wasn’t your home and that wouldn’t offer you dignified employment. Suppose you were elderly and handicapped in the South Bronx and had just been robbed and terrorized for the third time. In circumstances like those, you might say Maranatha and really mean it.
Even today, John the Baptist’s lonely, austere style of life bears witness to a reality that is coming, a reality that will expose all worldly realities, all earthly conditions, all human promises as fraudulent and transitory. His appearance on the scene at this time of year exposes our pretensions for what they really are. Never have we needed him more!

Read the whole post at Christianity Today.


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O Come, O Come Emmanuel (7) – Christmas Songs 2018

This rendition of O Come, O Come Emmanuel by Bette Midler was the only really traditional Christmas hymn on her seasonal album, Cool Yule, but it is a very assured and expressive vocal.


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The Ache For Peace (via Winn Collier)

Winn Collier writes about the longing that Advent epitomises, a Gospel fuelled desire for the fulfilment of redemption.
We have peace, and long for peace. We have hope, and long for that expectation to be fully realised.
From Collier:

I’m aching for peace.
To be sure, I’m not angling for anything easy or contrived or oblivious – that’s not peace; that’s avoidance. But I do want an end to relational hostility. I do want the hungry fed and the oppressed to be free. I do want enemies to become friends, or at least not to hate one another. I do want that inner quiet that marks the way of wisdom: the capacity to live in tensions, the courage to refuse the rage of the moment, the open-heartedness that allows us to be surprised, the tenacity to never lose hope.

Read his full devotional here.


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Converting Presbyterian Ministers To Advent

I keep track of Advent without specifically following it.
I think it’s helpful to acknowledge what the majority of Christians have been doing throughout the centuries and do throughout the world today, while affirming our non-conformist ways.
One of my colleagues was throwing a bit of shade about the situation the other night, and wanted to know what Advent was.
I told him it was when we could use one of these.

Imagine it, “Where’s the pastor?” “Just having his daily Advent observance?” “It’s only 9.30 in the morning.”
…I feel like an Advent, I feel like an Advent, I feel like an Advent or two.
…You can get it preparing a sermon, you can get it organising a roster, after a hard day’s pastoring a hard-earned thirst deserves an Advent observance. Advent, matter of fact I’ve got it now.


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Resilient Relationships And Daily Repentance (via Fleming Rutledge)

Fleming Rutledge writes about the final prophetic promise of the Christian Old Testament, and how that foreshadows the Gospel hope and the creation wide need for it.

The final words of the Christian Old Testament are quite amazing. The Hebrew Scriptures are arranged so that the prophetic literature is in the middle, but the Christian Old Testament has the prophets at the end. The last book is Malachi, and the next-to—last verses foresee a “great and terrible day,” the day of judgment and the second coming of the Lord. It will be a time when all that has been wrong will be set right. The example that Malachi gives is astonishing. At the last possible moment, he turns away from the language of wrath and flames to something very unexpected. This is the way the Old Testament ends: “Behold, I will send you the prophet Elijah [that would be John the Baptist] … He will turn the hearts of parents to their children and the hearts of children to their parents, so that I will not come and strike the land with a curse.”
The worst thing in the world, the prophet seems to be saying, is estrangement within families. It is given as the sign of the final judgment of God, his worst curse upon the human race. If you are a young person here today feeling miserable about your parents, if you are parents here today worried about your children, then this message is for you. God does not desire this situation. His will is for reconciliation. Family breakdown is a sign of the old age of Sin and Death. Reconciliation between parents and children is the sign that the kingdom of heaven is at hand.
Maybe you don’t have these kinds of problems yet in your family, but every family, over generations, will have some kind of wrenching, heartbreaking trouble. In every case, the fracturing of the most basic human connection is the antithesis of what God intends for his people. And reconciliation, when it happens, is one of the clearest of all indications that God is at work. Therefore the most important way that we can participate in the life of God is to seek reconciliation. Reconciliation is hard work. It requires daily repentance. For a number of years, I have had two distinguished psychoanalysts as teachers. I asked both of them a fundamental question: What is the most important ingredient in a strong marriage? They gave the same answer. One of them is a secular Jew so I was very surprised to hear him say, “The most important ingredient is asking forgiveness.”
Fleming Rutledge, Advent – The Once & Future Coming Of Jesus Christ, Eerdmans, 2018, pp 291-292.