There’s a world of difference between feeling bad and being sorry. A marker of that difference is whether the response to your wrongdoing is about managing the situation or seeking mercy. Sarah Condon mentions the example of Judas: This is where we learn the full meaning of what Judas has to teach us, one that’s …

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Sinclair Ferguson considers faith and repentance. Because they can be experienced differently and distinctly we might think they are separate. But that is unhelpful. From Ferguson: In grammatical terms, then, the words repent and believe both function as a synecdoche — the figure of speech in which a part is used for the whole. Thus, …

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Westminster Confession Of Faith – Lord’s Day 24 Chapter 15 – Of Repentance Unto Life (Cont.) (Paragraphs 4-6) IV. As there is no sin so small but it deserves damnation; so there is no sin so great that it can bring damnation upon those who truly repent. V. Men ought not to content themselves with …

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Westminster Confession Of Faith – Lord’s Day 23 Chapter 15 – Of Repentance Unto Life (Paragraphs 1-3) I. Repentance unto life is an evangelical grace, the doctrine whereof is to be preached by every minister of the gospel, as well as that of faith in Christ. II. By it a sinner, out of the sight …

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Showing leadership doesn’t always mean you’ll be sorry, but leadership requires doing it well when you should be sorry. Four constructive points from Michael Hyatt. He expands on these at his original post. Take ownership. Show remorse for the problem. Express gratitude for the reckoning. Resolve to take action.

A post by Benjamin Shaw on the Ligonier Blog about God’s work of repentance in the lives of Christians and how that process can take varying lengths of time in different individuals. An excerpt: Imagine repentance as a man walking in one direction who suddenly realizes that he is walking in the opposite direction from …

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