Ashley Hibbard provides a guest-post at Dashhouse which ponders whether management skill and leadership have supplanted serving as the marker of pastoral leadership in the church. Avoiding polar extremes, the problem identified is whether the motivation to engage with others is for their benefit, or to be noticed. From the post: There are many unhealthy …

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Some words of reflection about a pastoral ministry philosophy that is firm, but gentle; and does not come communicate disappointment and demand. Passion for growth of the kingdom can result as God’s people being seen as the means to implement a vision, rather than being the sphere in which the pastor serves. From Peter Bogert: …

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Something that I’ve become conscious of over the last couple of years is the link between growth in congregational size and change in leadership style. Increasing beyond certain numbers of people in a congregation is sometimes portrayed as a ‘barrier’. What is being identified in that is that at certain sizes a group of people …

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Thanks to Byron at the Snot Blog for pointing out this crisp yet creamy comparison between effective organisational culture and vanilla slice. From the article: Vanilla Slices, and our quest to find, describe, and prescribe the perfect one, is not dissimilar to our passion for good organisational culture. You may think that’s a stretch, but …

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I grew up with a church system that had two bodies, one tasked with spiritual and the other tasked with temporal matters. It is not a helpful distinction in so far as everything is spiritual and practical. At its worst the ‘temporal’ body can use its power to veto the plans of the ‘spiritual’ body, …

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Dan Hotchkiss observes that churches of a certain size tend toward staff-centered leadership structures. The first advantage of that structure is that they usually depend on one leader, and any disruption to that leader can have an inordinately disruptive effect on the organisation. He then points out a second, more philosophical disadvantage that resonates with …

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Reading this post by Dan Rockwell provided a moment of clarity on the difference between feedback and instruction. Good feedback energises performance, it doesn’t discourage effort. In a recent workshop, I invited a participant to knock a small box off a stool using a cookie. She stood with her back to the stool and tossed …

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