Our reaction to current events will reveal whether we truly remember that Christians are pilgrims not citizens of the realms in which we live. The Apostles’ Creed helps Christians remember our true status in the midst of a culture that demands our assimilation. From Ralph Davis: Some of us use the Apostles’ Creed in worship. …

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Watching a few episodes of ‘House Hunter’ style tv shows and you’ll become familiar with the search criteria of the ‘forever home.’ That’s the place where you expect to live until you can’t live in a house anymore. While a sense of stability is helpful in raising a family, Christians already have a forever home. …

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Many Christians around the world have given thought to the truth, “Dust you are, and to dust you will return.” Of course, our return to dust is grounded in the expectation that our dust will one day see our Redeemer through resurrected eyes. James Parker ruminates on middle age and expresses some wonderful phrases as …

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Spiritual life is a struggle between the true narrative of who we are in Christ and the lesser narratives that seek to impose themselves as our identity. We seek to nurture the true narrative, and we can adopt habits that deflate or subvert the lesser narratives from growing. From Trevin Wax. For years, people close …

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The path of self-righteousness is lined with knowledge of who Jesus is, but not knowing how much we personally need him. When we reach that point of need then we have a Saviour that we don’t just offer to others, we have a Saviour that has met our very personal need. From Rebecca Reynolds: My …

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It’s a worry if the church simply transfers the exhausting, life-draining, joy-sucking demands of the rest of life to its own agenda and programs. The Gospel demands that people need something very different than to feel that their church sees them as a resource to meet their goals. Worse still, the thought that coming to …

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It’s a tendency to see a prohibition as a limit on love. “I love you, but…” Michael Kelly points out that the prohibitions of God are not the limits of his love, but the expression of a care that flows from perfect love. He is not denying us, he is loving us. From Kelley’s article: …

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