mgpcpastor's blog


Leave a comment

Westminster Confession Of Faith – Lord’s Day 49

Westminster Confession Of Faith – Lord’s Day 49

Chapter 30 – Of Church Censures
I. The Lord Jesus, as king and head of his Church, has therein appointed a government in the hand of Church officers, distinct from the civil magistrate.
II. To these officers the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven are committed, by virtue whereof they have power respectively to retain and remit sins, to shut that kingdom against the impenitent, both by the word and censures; and to open it unto penitent sinners, by the ministry of the gospel, and by absolution from censures, as occasion shall require.
III. Church censures are necessary for the reclaiming and gaining of offending brethren; for deterring of others from like offenses; for purging out of that leaven which might infect the whole lump; for vindicating the honour of Christ, and the holy profession of the gospel; and for preventing the wrath of God, which might justly fall upon the Church, if they should suffer his covenant, and the seals thereof, to be profaned by notorious and obstinate offenders.
IV. For the better attaining of these ends, the officers of the Church are to proceed by admonition, suspension from the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper for a season, and by excommunication from the Church, according to the nature of the crime, and demerit of the person.


Leave a comment

Westminster Confession Of Faith – Lord’s Day 49

Westminster Confession Of Faith – Lord’s Day 49

Chapter 30 – Of Church Censures
I. The Lord Jesus, as king and head of his Church, has therein appointed a government in the hand of Church officers, distinct from the civil magistrate.
II. To these officers the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven are committed, by virtue whereof they have power respectively to retain and remit sins, to shut that kingdom against the impenitent, both by the word and censures; and to open it unto penitent sinners, by the ministry of the gospel, and by absolution from censures, as occasion shall require.
III. Church censures are necessary for the reclaiming and gaining of offending brethren; for deterring of others from like offenses; for purging out of that leaven which might infect the whole lump; for vindicating the honour of Christ, and the holy profession of the gospel; and for preventing the wrath of God, which might justly fall upon the Church, if they should suffer his covenant, and the seals thereof, to be profaned by notorious and obstinate offenders.
IV. For the better attaining of these ends, the officers of the Church are to proceed by admonition, suspension from the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper for a season, and by excommunication from the Church, according to the nature of the crime, and demerit of the person.


Leave a comment

Exit Doors From The Faith For Young Women And Men

Mikey Lynch posts in appreciation for material from Dominic Steele.
Young women and men can fall away from their committment to the faith.
Young women take the exit door marked ‘relationship’.
Young men take the exit door marked ‘ambition’.
And sometimes the young woman will feel under pressure because the committed man she married has taken his exit.
There’s a reason why generalisations are generalisations. We’re all aware of situations where young people of either gender have taken the other door. But being aware of the most prevalent snare for each gender is valuable.


Leave a comment

Spoon? There Is No Spoon

In some sort of relationship to my previous post, lots of other Christians have disagreements with each other, not just presbyterian/reformed ones.
Some disagreements are absolutely necessary and cannot be avoided.
This video features Brian MacLaren being questioned by Scot McKnight.
McKnight describes himself as an anabaptist and has had some charitable things to say about aspects of the emergent movement. MacLaren is… well that’s what the questions are about.
MacLaren is quite unhappy about polemics and definitive answers. And he seems to think that anyone who doesn’t hold that view not in a good place and is wrong. In a un-polemical and non-definitive way.
You have been warned that this is 19 minutes of your life that you’ll never get back. If you allow it all to buffer about the last third will suffice. But if you’ve only even encountered clear and genuine Bible teaching before you’ll see what was being touted as the future of evangelicalism by TIME magazine not so many years ago.
The title of this post relates to an interchange between two characters in the movie, The Matrix. It was all that would come to mind after watching this.
Vodpod videos no longer available.

Jared Wilson put it like this:

Does Brian McLaren Want a Glass of Milk?
Watched this exchange between Brian McLaren and Scot McKnight and was astounded at how awesomely McLaren is able to give lengthy answers to simple questions that don’t really answer the questions. He’s above the questions somehow, like Neo from the Matrix. It led me to imagine this exchange in the McLaren household.

Q: Brian, would you like a glass of milk?
McLaren: Why do you ask about the glass of milk, a reductive question, when the larger question is whether cows are meant to provide sustenance for non-cows? I’m very sympathetic to how hard it is for you to step into the bovine paradigm and see from this other perspective. In my writing I try to drive more into the core issues of hunger and thirst, universal issues elevated far above the overly narrow constraints of questions like yours, which you can’t even see from the outside because of the confines of the udder-consumer narrative in the dairy/household paradigm. I was a milk-drinker for years, I’ve come out of that background, so I understand why you’d ask the question.

I can only further add that MacLaren would probably reject being subject to concepts such as ‘like’ and ‘thirst’ as well, since they seem to derive from the erroneous concept of milk ingestion posited.


Leave a comment

Heidelberg Catechism – Lord’s Day 31

Q & A 83
Q. What are the keys of the kingdom?
A. The preaching of the holy gospel and Christian discipline toward repentance. Both preaching and discipline open the kingdom of heaven to believers and close it to unbelievers.

Q & A 84
Q. How does preaching the gospel open and close the kingdom of heaven?
A. According to the command of Christ: The kingdom of heaven is opened by proclaiming and publicly declaring to all believers, each and every one, that, as often as they accept the gospel promise in true faith, God, because of what Christ has done, truly forgives all their sins.
The kingdom of heaven is closed, however, by proclaiming and publicly declaring to unbelievers and hypocrites that, as long as they do not repent, the anger of God and eternal condemnation rest on them.
God’s judgment, both in this life and in the life to come, is based on this gospel testimony.

Q & A 85
Q. How is the kingdom of heaven closed and opened by Christian discipline?
A. According to the command of Christ: Those who, though called Christians, profess unchristian teachings or live unchristian lives, and after repeated and loving counsel refuse to abandon their errors and wickedness, and after being reported to the church, that is, to its officers, fail to respond also to their admonition — such persons the officers exclude from the Christian fellowship by withholding the sacraments from them, and God himself excludes them from the kingdom of Christ.
Such persons, when promising and demonstrating genuine reform, are received again as members of Christ and of his church.