mgpcpastor's blog


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The Ultimate Star Wars Trailer

This fan-made trailer is for the whole Star Wars saga thus far.
It looks like they’ve been telling one story all along.
(I think Han even shoots first)


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How Funko Makes Its Pop! Figures

Funko Pop! figures are a bit of phenomenon. Having watched toys and action figures for a few decades now, for something new to come and become a pervasive presence in both the general toy buying public and the collecting fanbase across a number of genres is very unusual. How long will it last?
Here’a couple of background videos.
One from Forbes. (a bit of sign that this is mainstream business)

And one from SYFY Wire.


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The Most Interesting Man In The World

Know your meme sources.
An article I read today referenced the actor who plays the part of ‘The Most Interesting Man In The World’ for a series of commercials for a brand of beer.
The image pops up as an internet meme “I don’t always …, but when I do I …”, adding to the popularity of the image.

The conceit of the ads is something akin to ‘Chuck Norris’ jokes.
Here’s compilation of some of the ads.
A good source of material for dad jokes.


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1000 People Of Dance

In which Matt Bray spends a year travelling the globe, videoing different people doing the same dance with him at various locations, then edits together a single clip.
It’s all come together pretty well, and is a feel-good few minutes that took a long time to produce.


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Alaskan Car Jumping

This could be a thing in Mount Gambier.
Simple premise: people watching stripped back vehicles speed off the edge of a cliff.
“Gravity always wins”

A news report style clip.

This video has better footage of the actual jumps.


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’Straya In A Snack Biscuit

It’s hard to think of anything more idiosyncratic that cheese and Vegemite flavored Shape biscuits (made in the classic style with the flavor that comes off on your fingers, none of this baked inside nonsense).

They’re even shaped like little Australian map outlines. I assume Tasmania is meant to be included on the bottom right of the Shape.

Taste is vaguely cheese with yeasty overtones.

Australia, you’re so fine, you’re so fine you blow my mind. Australia! Australia!


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Finding Joy In The Giver, Rather Than The Gift (via Emily Cobb at Gospel Coalition Australia)

Christians who have been watching the Netflix show Tidying Up with Marie Kondo will have found much that is helpful in culture that seems to generate clutter.
There will have been some moments, statements and actions that will have struck disciples of Jesus as more than oddly idiosyncratic, but rather somewhat disquieting.
At Gospel Coalition Australia, Emily Cobb explains the world-view underpinnings of KonMari and why, though the outcomes may seem to harmonise with some Christian values, the philosophy it espouses stops short of the values that Christians live by.
From the post:

As I tuned in to the peaceful show of Tidying Up with Marie Kondo, I was taken aback with Kondo’s need to introduce herself to the house, and her instruction to thank the clothes that don’t bring joy. What is she doing? On one level, it seems like a lovely thing—one tidying up disciple labeled it as simply ‘being grateful’. Yet thanking inanimate objects such as a brick and mortar home, or a cotton blouse should cause us to pause and consider what is going on. While the show hasn’t explicitly stated any religious ties (aside from the Christian tidying-up disciples who say grace and thank God), this practice of thanking objects can be tied to the traditional Japanese religion of Shinto. In Shintoism, there is a belief that inanimate objects can actually possess a spirit or kami—a godlike essence or energy that needs to be respected. This reverence for the energy in objects is doing exactly what Romans 1:25 proclaims: worshipping the creation rather the Creator. Similarly, in materialism we place our hope and delight in an item, glorifying and idolising our purchase. While the spiritual significance may not be as abundantly clear as in Shintoism, the spiritual reality is almost identical. As Christians, we need to be grateful to the Giver, not the given. Worshipping and thanking God who provided the home or the clothes, rather than the objects themselves.

Read the whole post at Gospel Coalition Australia.