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Anger Management When The Anger Is With God (via Bonnie Zahl)

Anger with God is not unbelief.
It is an aspect of faith that has reached its current limitations.
Bonnie Zahl writes about the various ways in which a relationship with God will sometimes find us in pain and wrestling with him.
Being in relationship with other Christians we need to grow together in grace and patience to bear one another through these dark seasons.

In my many years of speaking with people who are angry at God, I have never met a person who told me that what they needed was a reminder of how to think correctly about their situation. In fact, there is some evidence to suggest the opposite: studies show that if people are made to feel judged, ashamed, or guilty about feeling angry at God, they are more likely to continue feeling angry at God, to reject God, and to use alcohol and other substances to cope. In contrast, people who said they were supported when they disclosed their anger reported greater engagement in their spiritual life and more spiritual growth as a result of the difficult experience.

Read the whole article at Mockingbird.


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God Moves In A Mysterious Way – The Legacy Hymn Of William Cowper

Scott Hubbard writes about William Cowper, who on New Year’s Day 1773 was about to slip into a depression that would remain for the rest of his life.
Anticipating that descending darkness Cowper wrote the hymn God Moves In A Mysterious Way.
From Hubbard’s article:

… before night fell on Cowper’s soul, he sat in the light of his remaining sanity, took up his pen, and wrote a hymn that has strengthened generations of staggering saints through their various shadows.
Take Courage
Cowper’s hymn “God Moves in a Mysterious Way” is a song for every saint who sits on the edge. It is a guide for all who do not see fresh hopes rising over the horizon of the new year. It is a confession of faith in the face of darkness — one that flickers with enough light to carry us through whatever midnights this year brings.
At the heart of the hymn is a simple exhortation: “Ye fearful saints, fresh courage take.” Take courage. Take courage when the clouds come thundering toward you. Take courage when the coming days seem covered in shadow. Take courage when you cannot understand God’s ways.
But why, we ask in the valley, should we take courage? Throughout the rest of the hymn, Cowper gives his reasons.

Read the rest of the post at Desiring God.

Here’s Nathan Tasker’s rendition of the hymn.
I wanted a version that has the lyrics to the forefront.


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Ten Bible Passages For Severe Illness (via Kathryn Butler)

This article by Kathryn Butler at Desiring God features ten Bible verses/passages that speak of the presence of God’s love to those who are suffering.
It is helpful in encouraging Christians to remember these verses for their own encouragement, and also, of course, to share with others.
It is by no means an exhaustive list, but it is a helpful start.
Five are from Psalms and five are from the New Testament.

PSALM 46:1–3
“God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. Therefore we will not fear though the earth gives way, though the mountains be moved into the heart of the sea, though its waters roar and foam, though the mountains tremble at its swelling.”
2 CORINTHIANS 4:16–18
“Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal.”

Read the whole article here.


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Just Because Jesus Loves Us And Knows How To Fix Our Problems Doesn’t Mean He Takes A Shortcut Through Our Grief (via Scott Hubbard at Desiring God)

God sees our tears, and in the person of Jesus he has shed tears of his own.
Our tears matter.
From Scott Hubbard at Desiring God.

When Jesus joined a crowd outside the town of Nain and watched a widow weep over her son’s body, “he had compassion on her” (Luke 7:13). Later, when Mary fell apart at Jesus’s feet over the death of her brother, the man of sorrows went one step further: “Jesus wept” (John 11:35). Jesus had compassion, and Jesus wept — even though Jesus was about to speak the word to snatch them both back from death (Luke 7:14; John 11:43).
Just because Jesus loves us and knows how to fix our problems doesn’t mean he takes a shortcut through our grief. The same one who raises the dead first stops to linger with us in our sorrow — to climb down into our valley of tears and walk alongside us.

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Tumbling Sky – Matt Searles’ Album Of Psalms For Weary Souls Free For A Limited Time

To mark the release of his book Tumbling Sky: Psalm Devotions for Weary Souls Matt Searles is making the album which inspired the book available for free download.
The album is a wonderful addition to Searles’ two earlier productions.
The Psalms are chosen this time to reflect the ministry that they offer to those in times of lament or suffering.
I don’t know how long the offer will last.

Go here for information about the devotional book.

Go here for the free music.


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Spurgeon’s Sorrows by Zack Eswine

9781781915387I like Zack Eswine’s writing.
In Spurgeon’s Sorrows Eswine sensitively considers the experience of depression, using Charles Spurgeon’s experiences and writings as a reference point.
Such are the variations in depression I’m loathe to generalise or make it look like there are universal treatments that will bring relief.
It’s not a long book, but it is sensitive and constructive.

Here’s the book’s blurb:

Christians should have the answers, shouldn’t they? Depression affects many people both personally and through the ones we love. Here Zack Eswine draws from C.H Spurgeon, ‘the Prince of Preachers’ experience to encourage us. What Spurgeon found in his darkness can serve as a light in our own darkness. Zack Eswine brings you here, not a self-help guide, rather ‘a handwritten note of one who wishes you well.’


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You’re Not (via Paul Tripp)

This is from Paul Tripp:

When I’m
Weary and exhausted
You’re not.
When I’m
Confused and discouraged
You’re not.
When I’m
Fickle and unfaithful
You’re not.
When I’m
Doubtful and disheartened
You’re not.
When I’m
Fearful and anxious
You’re not.
When I’m
Short-sighted and fearful
You’re not.
When I’m
Tired and about to quit
You’re not.
When I’m
Lacking in hope and love
You’re not.
When I’m
Shocked and surprised
You’re not.
When I’m
Angrily withholding grace
You’re not.
When I’m
Unfaithful to what I’ve promised
You’re not.
When I’m
Selfish and disloyal
You’re not.
Oh, Lord of
Faithfulness and grace
I am so thankful
That
In those moments
When I’m
Losing my way
You’re not.

source