Fellow Mount Gambier pastor Rudy Furlong read these to us this morning.
They make sense and are similar to other protocols I’ve heard.
Thing is, hearts that want to grow in grace will benefit from accountability like this. Hearts that do not will see such principles as a burden. These rules are not the final word. Accountability is.

Thou shalt not go to lunch alone with the opposite sex. *
Thou shalt not have the opposite sex pick you up or drive you places when it is just the two of you.*
Thou shalt not kiss any attender of the opposite sex or show affection that could be questioned.*
Thou shalt not visit the opposite sex alone at home. *
Thou shalt not counsel the opposite sex alone at the office, and thou shalt not counsel the opposite sex more than once without that person’s mate. Refer them.
Thou shalt not discuss detailed sexual problems with the opposite sex in counseling. Refer them.
Thou shalt not discuss your marriage problems with an attender of the opposite sex.
Thou shalt be careful in answering emails, instant messages, chatrooms, cards or letters from the opposite sex.
Thou shalt make your co-worker your protective ally.
Thou shalt pray for the integrity of other staff members.
* The first four do not apply to unmarried staff.

I’d be happy for the first four to apply to singles.

4 thoughts on “Rick Warren’s Ten Commandments For Church Staff

  1. Ben Palmer says:

    The “ten commandments” style is a bit annoying to me but they are great principles for church staff – and I was about to say “I’d think about taking the asterisks off the first four – especially number four” but you beat me to it. I think that the other conept that is relevent here as well as accountability is prudence.

  2. al bain says:

    Thou shalt not kiss any attender of the opposite sex or show affection that could be questioned.*

    Really? Not even when you have people over to your house and your wife’s there? And she kisses the husband of the woman I kissed?

    That seems a bit rugged.

    1. gjware says:

      That may not have been the kissing they had in mind.
      I didn’t really grow up in a culture where it was a form of social greeting.
      It seems to be an affectation that has grown in popular usage.
      The fact that the prohibition doesn’t apply to singles doesn’t add any clarity either.
      What sort of duty of care protocols are you folk using?

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