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Something For The Teachers – ‘One More Day’

For all the teachers out there, if you haven’t seen this, chances are you’ll be shown it sometime or another.
A routine teacher’s welcome back day brightened up with a specially themed flash mob using One More Day as its inspiration.
Put the closed caption subtitles on to view all the return to teaching lyrics.


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Let Go Of Old Grudges

If you don’t know who these two are don’t worry. 

 


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One Evidence That God Is With You (via Dale Ralph Davis)

“Sometimes the clearest evidence that God has not deserted you is not that you are successfully past your trial but that you are still on your feet in the middle of it.”
Dale Ralph Davis, 1 Samuel, 2010, p. 200


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Faith To Be Strong by Andrew Peterson

This song comes to mind at the moment.


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Do Not Lose Heart In Preaching – Kanishka Raffel Interview

Another helpful interview posted by St Helen’s Bishopsgate, this time with Kanishka Raffel from Perth, Western Australia.
The theme is not losing heart as we preach the Gospel.
Conducted in an interview style, Kanishka models a very winsome and engaging expositional style as he opens 2 Corinthians 4 to show the reasons for being encouraged when circumstances lack encouragements.


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Spurgeon’s Sorrows by Zack Eswine

9781781915387I like Zack Eswine’s writing.
In Spurgeon’s Sorrows Eswine sensitively considers the experience of depression, using Charles Spurgeon’s experiences and writings as a reference point.
Such are the variations in depression I’m loathe to generalise or make it look like there are universal treatments that will bring relief.
It’s not a long book, but it is sensitive and constructive.

Here’s the book’s blurb:

Christians should have the answers, shouldn’t they? Depression affects many people both personally and through the ones we love. Here Zack Eswine draws from C.H Spurgeon, ‘the Prince of Preachers’ experience to encourage us. What Spurgeon found in his darkness can serve as a light in our own darkness. Zack Eswine brings you here, not a self-help guide, rather ‘a handwritten note of one who wishes you well.’


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No Sea, But There Will Be A River (via R.C. Sproul)

I always maintain that my lack of affection for beaches is simply a matter of anticipated eschatology.
This excerpt from R.C. Sproul’s Surprised By Suffering reminds us that the future promise is really about what is present and what is absent, and the comfort that should arise from that expectation.
Scripture often speaks of the entire creation awaiting the final act of redemption. To destroy something completely and to replace it with something utterly new is not an act of redemption. To redeem something is to save that which is in imminent danger of being lost. The renovation may be radical. It may involve a violent conflagration of purging, but the purifying act ultimately redeems rather than annihilates. The new heaven and the new earth will be purified. There will be no room for evil in the new order.

Surprised by Suffering by R.C. Sproul is available to download the ebook free through August 31, 2014.

From Ligonier.

A hint of the quality of the new heaven and new earth is found in the somewhat cryptic words, “Also there was no more sea” (Rev. 21:1). For people who have a love for the seashore and all that it represents in terms of beauty and recreation, it may seem strange to contemplate a new earth without any sea. But to the ancient Jew, it was a different matter. In Jewish literature, the sea was often used as a symbol for that which was ominous, sinister, and threatening. Earlier in the Revelation of John, we see the Beast emerging from the sea (Rev. 13). Likewise, in ancient Semitic mythology, there is frequent reference to the primordial sea monster that represents the shadowy chaos. The Babylonian goddess Tiamat is a case in point.
In Jewish thought, the river, the stream, or the spring functioned as the positive symbol of goodness. This was natural in a desert habitat where a stream was life itself. If we look at a relief map of Palestine, we see how crucial to the life of the land is the Jordan River. It cuts like a ribbon through the heart of an arid and parched land, connecting the Sea of Galilee in the north with the Dead Sea in the south.
The Mediterranean coast of western Palestine is marked by rocky shoals and jutting mountains. The ancient Hebrews did not develop a sea trade because the terrain was not suitable for much shipping. The sea represented trouble to them. It was from the Mediterranean that violent storms arose.
We see this contrasting imagery in Psalm 46. The psalmist writes: “God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. Therefore we will not fear, even though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea; though its waters roar and be troubled, though the mountains shake with its swelling” (vv. 1–3). Then he adds, “There is a river whose streams shall make glad the city of God” (v. 4).
I live in central Florida. Our area is sometimes described as “the lightning capital of America.” The summer months bring severe electrical storms. My grandchildren are frequently frightened by what they call the “booming.” The loud thunderclaps are not a part of what they would envision heaven to include.
But the Jews feared other problems from the sea besides turbulent storms. Their traditional archrivals, marauders who beset them countless times, were a seacoast nation. The Philistines came from the direction of the sea.
The Jew looked to a new world where all the evils symbolized by the sea would be absent. The new earth will have water. It will have a river. It will have life-giving streams. But there will be no sea there.