In a church plant (and, in a more limited way in a revitalisation) the leader has a considerable degree of discretion and control about how things are done. With an established church, particularly those of smaller to medium size, people have a sense of ownership and partnership that means the introduction of change needs to …

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Ron Edmondson offers five observations regarding culture change in a local church: They’re pretty sensible, but can be overlooked because of enthusiasm or over-confidence. Taking the time to get to know the church and its existing culture (in contrast to its behaviour; trying to understand why people are doing what they’re doing) is necessary and …

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This article is sort of a plug for the author’s web-based church revitalisation program, but there are a few phrases that resonate in communicating a mission focussed vision for local churches that need revitalisation. One of the most important revitalization changes we faced was to move from a ‘country club’ church to a ‘mission-based’ church. …

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In a post about necessary qualities of church revitalisers (those who come be nurture new vitality in an existing church, in contrast with church planters who are starting a new church) Ed Stetzer writes about the need for relational patience, a quality any pastor who is working with an existing church needs. …church revitalizers must …

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Having come from a meeting today where church attendance figures were submitted, this article by Karl Vaters makes some helpful points. While there is an average number of people attending a church, in reality attendances can fluctuate between, say, thirty-five an sixty people. That difference makes a significant change in tone, and, realistically, most weeks …

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This is a heart-achingly sad feature article by Garry Maddox on Fairfax about the Olympia Milk Bar (Parramatta Road, Sydney) and its owner. The Milk Bar was forced closed by the local council due to severe structural problems in the building, along with other signs of disrepair. And yet, within the milk-bar that never opens …

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“They thought their business model could just roll out.” I’ve watched forty years or so of church ministries franchise themselves as the future of the church without having the humility or awareness to realise that they were a lot more dependent on local circumstances and personalities than they thought. “The company said that it would …

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