We live in an age which confuses activity for fruitfulness.
Christians can import that confusion into the way they follow Jesus.
Part of the discernment process of wisdom is not to simply know right from wrong, but to also know which is best from among a range of worthy opportunities.
HT: Z

From Randy Alcorn.

The hardest lesson we learned in our first twenty years of marriage was this: life is full of good, worthwhile, and meaningful programs, activities, organizations, causes, and ministry opportunities — the vast majority of which we cannot and should not be involved with!
It is not sufficient that something be good or important. It must be the best and most important for me, and God must show me that. Why? For the same reason that if I have a hundred dollars to spend on groceries this month, I should buy meat and milk and fruit and vegetables, not donuts and chips. Most good things I will never be able to do. If I try, I’ll burn out and end up dropping out of half of them and doing the rest poorly.
We sometimes mistake Christian busyness for true spirituality, failing to realize that over-commitment is no more honoring to God than under-commitment. In our relentless pursuit of spiritual success, we drag ourselves through a dizzy, busy, barren life. Our unspoken motto seems to be “Weariness is next to godliness.”

Read the whole post at Eternal Perspective.

One thought on “Mistaking Christian Busyness For True Spirituality (via Randly Alcorn)

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